Towson women gobble up 33 turnovers, Loyola, 78-66 Hungry Tigers rebound from rout by Vanderbilt

December 04, 1996|By Steven Kivinski | Steven Kivinski,CONTRIBUTING WRITER

The injury-riddled and victory-deprived Loyola women's basketball team limped into the Towson Center last night looking for its first win of the season.

The Greyhounds went to the wrong place.

Towson State, which was still smarting from last week's 77-45 loss to then-No. 7 Vanderbilt, forced 33 turnovers and rolled to a 78-66 win.

"We knew Loyola was going to be hungry tonight, we just thought we would be a little hungrier," said Towson State coach Ellen Fitzkee, who is three games shy of becoming the first Towson State women's basketball coach to reach 100 victories. PTC "Loyola is one of the best 0-3 teams I've ever seen, and I knew we were going to have to get after them and put pressure on them for 94 feet."

The Tigers (2-1), who have won 19 of 24 meetings with the Greyhounds, got 14 points, six rebounds and four steals from senior forward Nicole Norman and 13 points from junior guard Danita Smith.

"We had 19 turnovers at the half. How many games are you going to win turning the ball over 19 times in a half?" said Greyhounds coach Pat Coyle, whose team is now 0-4. "We have to learn how to control the ball and to execute."

Loyola forward Lynn Albert, an All-Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference selection last season, didn't seem bothered by the back injury that sidelined her for the Greyhounds' first two games. The senior from Carmel, N.Y., kept the Greyhounds in it early, scoring 10 of her game-high 18 points before halftime.

Loyola took a 19-14 lead with 7: 20 left in the first half on a free throw by Jina Mosley (11 points). Then, a series of Greyhounds turnovers enabled the Tigers to surge to a 38-27 lead.

The Greyhounds tried to stage a comeback but couldn't overcome the giveaways and Towson's 17-for-18 performance from the foul line in the second half.

Pub Date: 12/04/96

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