Catonsville CC ends No. 8 with Taylor, Dunbar

SIDELINES

December 01, 1996|By Pat O'Malley | Pat O'Malley,SUN STAFF

Ring up another outstanding women's soccer season at Catonsville Community College for the county duo of coach Tom Taylor and striker Cassidie Dunbar of South River.

Taylor, a county resident and North County faculty member/coach (girls lacrosse), led the Cardinals to a sixth consecutive finish in the top 10 among junior colleges nationally. Catonsville (16-3-1) was ranked eighth.

Dunbar, the former All-Metro and All-County player at South River, scored 30 of the team's school-record 105 goals and added 16 assists.

"Cassidie is the No. 1-ranked junior-college player in Maryland and should be an All-American a second straight year," said Taylor.

Dunbar is considering an array of schools for her final two college years, among them Radford (Va.), Towson State, Florida State, Florida Atlantic, Alabama, Samford (Ala.) and Coker (S.C.).

Teammates Jen Mazzola of Old Mill, North County's Jen Tinsley and Kathy Dunaway, a Pasadena resident who attended Seton-Keough, joined Dunbar on the All-Region XX team.

Other county products contributing to Catonsville's success were Meade graduates Brandy Gregg and Mary Rafters, and former Arundel goalkeeper Marcia Lavin.

Terror famers

Tom Tereshinski, former Southern of Harwood football coach, and Scott Joyner, ex-Arundel High baseball/soccer standout, have been inducted into Western Maryland College's Hall of Fame.

Tereshinski, who resides in Galesville in south county, and Joyner, now a resident of Round Rock, Texas, were members of the 19th group of Green Terror inductees.

A three-year football and baseball player, Tereshinski started at the Westminster college in 1940 but because of World War II didn't graduate until 1949.

Tereshinski, a native of Glen Lyon, Pa., left Western Maryland after his junior year for the U.S. Army and the war. Severely wounded in 1945, he spent nearly three years in hospitals before returning to Western Maryland as an assistant football coach and head baseball coach.

After receiving his bachelor's degree, Tereshinski taught 28 years in Anne Arundel County. Starting in 1963, he was Southern's head football coach for 11 years.

Joyner graduated from Arundel in 1962 as a standout soccer goalkeeper and outfielder/pitcher in baseball. At Western Maryland, Joyner moved from the goal to forward and led the soccer team in scoring all four years.

In baseball, Joyner, who had a .309 career batting average, still holds the college's record for career homers (14) and ranks second in ERA (2.14).

Named MVP of the Middle Atlantic Conference Southern Division his junior year, Joyner was drafted by the Pittsburgh Pirates and played briefly in the minors before going off to war. Serving in the Army in Vietnam, Joyner received a Bronze Star. He is now a Texas businessman.

Sideliners

Chesapeake grad Brandon Steinheim ran for 203 yards in a win over Jersey City in his final game for Wesley College (Dover, Del.) to set an NCAA Division III record for consecutive 100-yard rushing games (19). Steinheim also set single-season school records for rushing yards (1,684) and touchdowns (20).

Stephanie Roberts, former Sun girls soccer Player of the Year as a striker with 22 goals and six assists for Severna Park in 1992, has completed her career as a defender for Loyola College. Roberts earned All-Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference honors, and the Greyhounds won their second MAAC title in four championship games.

Hot-stove baseball

Mike Bielecki, Atlanta Braves relief pitcher and Crownsville resident, headlines the Friends of Joe Cannon Baseball Card show from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Dec. 8 at Glen Burnie High's cafeteria. Proceeds go to the group's scholarship fund. Information: (410) 360-1768 or (410) 255-1427.

The Southern Maryland Baseball Camp is scheduled for Sundays, Jan. 5 through Feb. 16, at Northern High in Calvert County. Information: Texas Rangers scout Jerry Wargo, (301) 855-8558.

Pub Date: 12/01/96

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