Military brass still just don't get itNov. 13 news story...

LETTERS

November 18, 1996

Military brass still just don't get it

Nov. 13 news story about Aberdeen Proving Ground attributed to battalion commander Lt. Col. Don Hogge the following quote:

''I have my executive officers give a different talk to the guys, and we bring the females out because sometimes the language that is used is inappropriate for the women to hear. Sometimes the slang words that men have for women out on the streets are used, and we take the females out to avoid them having to hear that.''

Excuse me? Did I really read that correctly?

I find it outrageous that Colonel Hogge feels some of his soldiers need protection while others do not.

I am sure there are some male soldiers who would find these words offensive as well. Why are they not removed?

Instead of separating the sexes and allowing that ''locker-room'' mentality to continue, perhaps he ought to forbid it from occurring in the first place.

After all, it is this tolerance for allowing men to verbally degrade women in one situation that perpetuates sexual harassment in all situations.

It sounds like the training needs to begin at the top before it will be understood by those below.

Susan Luecke

Baltimore

Lake was drained for the affluent

Several weeks ago my family went to Rocky Gap State Park for a weekend of camping. We wanted to set up our pop-up-tent camper in the usual spot we select alongside a lake. Much to our surprise, the lake was no longer there, having been drained in preparation for building a golf course.

The lake is now a stream not much more than two feet wide. Apparently the environmental regulations that apply to everyone else do not apply to the state. If a farmer were to do the same thing to correct a low spot in one of his fields the environmental people would be on him with an army.

We have been told that the golf course is one of Gov. Parris Glendening's projects to help improve the economy of Western Maryland.

How many jobs for the unemployed will be created by construction of a golf course? Minimum-wage jobs in restaurants, hotels, or as groundskeepers on golf courses, will be what they get and not what they want.

The dismantling of the amenities at Rocky Gap State Park is another example of the weakening of environmental regulations by the Glendening administration.

A lake that once was used for water sports and fishing must give way for the construction of a golf course.

Camping is an activity that can be done by a family on a low budget. Why should the environment be destroyed and a place that low-income families can enjoy be displaced for the more affluent who want to play golf?

Susan M. Schwinn

Middle River

Newt gambit is GOP opportunity

Chess players understand why some Republicans urge Newt Gingrich to step aside as speaker during his ethics review -- in order to have an unimpeded corridor of attack on President Clinton in his ethics review.

It's a daring and usually effective ploy to sacrifice one's queen for a clear shot at the opposing king.

David Kirby

Baltimore

Clinton hit on assisted dying

It was a shock to learn that President Clinton has asked the Supreme Court to oppose any form of assisted dying.

That is cruel to persons in a terminal condition who are in incurable pain and who persistently ask for such help. Many polls show that a majority of the American people favor a highly limited, safeguarded form of physician aid in dying.

For instance, a nationwide Harris poll asked the following question: "Do you think the law should allow doctors to comply with the wishes of a dying patient in severe distress, who asks to have his or her life ended, or not?" Of those polled, 73 percent answered "yes" and 24 percent "no."

Please notice four key words in this question. "Allow" means that no doctor is required to do it against his own conscience; "dying" means that the permission is limited to terminal cases; "severe distress" includes incurable pain, and then "asks." As the Supreme Court decided in the Cruzan case, there must be "clear and convincing" evidence that the patient wants to die.

Ralph White

Cockeysville

Editorial on judges called fallacious

Your editorial, "Exhibit A against elected judgeships," is fallacious. In prior editorials, you championed "retention elections." In such elections, judges will campaign on their records to be either approved or disapproved for an extension of their term. In retention elections, with only a slight modification, the same propositions set forth in your editorial would apply.

Unless you are proposing that judges be appointed for life (heaven forbid!), retention elections will be just as divisive, but deny members of the public the right to select a judge when they believe the governor was in error.

Wallace Kleid

Towson

Aid to Zaire should be U.S. responsibility

The roots of the current crisis in the Great Lakes region of Central Africa are indeed complex. Centuries-old ethnic tensions have erupted, fueled by modern-day warlords' scheming that has instilled fear and prevented an orderly return by the refugees to Rwanda.

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