Here is how members of Maryland's delegation on Capitol...

Votes in Congress

September 29, 1996|By Roll Call Report Syndicate

Here is how members of Maryland's delegation on Capitol Hill were recorded on important roll-call votes last week:

Y: Yes .. N: No .. X: Not voting

House: Congressional Pensions

By a vote of 391 for and 32 against, the House sent the Senate a bill (HR 4011) denying congressional pensions to lawmakers convicted of felonies related to their congressional work. They would get back their own contributions in a lump sum but receive no other payments from their taxpayer-subsidized retirement plan. The bill applies to future cases. Its Republican sponsors, however, mentioned former Democratic Rep. Dan Rostenkowski of Illinois, who is drawing a pension of nearly $100,000 a year while serving prison time for criminal offenses including embezzlement. He is one of more than a dozen convicted felons from both parties now receiving congressional pensions.

0$ A yes vote was to pass the bill.

N X Member

Y * * Ehrlich, Robert L., R-2nd

Y * * Bartlett, Roscoe G., R-6th

Y * * Cardin, Benjamin L., D-3rd

Y * * Gilchrest, Wayne T., R-1st

Y * * Hoyer, Steny H. D-5th

Y * * Wynn, Albert R., D-4th

Y * * Cummings, Elijah E., D-7th

Y * * Morella, Constance A., R-8th

House: Immigration

Voting 305 for and 123 against, the House approved the conference report on a bill (HR 2202) to combat illegal immigration while sharply limiting public benefits to legal aliens. The bill bans public aid except emergency medical care to illegals, more than doubles the current force of U.S. border guards, permits increased wiretapping of suspected smugglers of aliens, allows secret deportation hearings in certain cases and builds massive border fences near San Diego. Also, it establishes a pilot program to help employers voluntarily check the legality of job applicants. But critics said it lacked tough measures to dissuade employers from hiring undocumented workers.

3' A yes vote was to approve the bill.

N X Member

Y * * Ehrlich, Robert L., R-2nd

Y * * Bartlett, Roscoe G., R-6th

Y * * Cardin, Benjamin L., D-3rd

Y * * Gilchrest, Wayne T., R-1st

Y * * Hoyer, Steny H. D-5th

* N * Wynn, Albert R., D-4th

* N * Cummings, Elijah E., D-7th

* N * Morella, Constance A., R-8th

House: Democrats' Bill

The House rejected, 179 for and 247 against, a Democratic rewrite of pending immigration legislation (HR 2202, above). Democrats sought to toughen the treatment of employers who hire illegals by steps such as funding more Labor Department inspectors and enabling the department to subpoena hiring data. Also, Democrats sought to retain certain anti-discrimination language that the bill would repeal, stop the bill's denial of medical benefits to legal aliens with AIDS and prevent it from easing environmental laws to speed construction in border areas.

A yes vote supported the Democrats' changes to a pending immigration bill.

Y N X Member

* N * Ehrlich, Robert L, R-2nd

* N * Bartlett, Roscoe G., R-6th

Y * * Cardin, Benjamin L., D-3rd

* N * Gilchrest, Wayne T., R-1st

Y * * Hoyer, Steny H. D-5th

Y * * Wynn, Albert R., D-4th

Y * * Cummings, Elijah E., D-7th

Y * * Morella, Constance A., R-8th

House: Public Education

Voting 254 for and 175 against, the House sent the Senate a bill (HR 4134) allowing states to deny public education to children of illegal immigrants. Students enrolled for the current academic year are exempted and could continue attendance through grade 12. The bill originally was part of HR 2202 (above).

0$ A yes vote was to pass the bill.

N X Member

Y * * Ehrlich, Robert L., R-2nd

Y * * Bartlett, Roscoe G., R-6th

Y * * Cardin, Benjamin L., D-3rd

Y * * Gilchrest, Wayne T., R-1st

* N * Hoyer, Steny H. D-5th

* N * Wynn, Albert R., D-4th

* N * Cummings, Elijah E., D-7th

* N * Morella, Constance A., R-8th

Senate: Abortion

By a vote of 57 for and 41 against, the Senate failed to achieve the two-thirds majority needed to override President Clinton's veto of a bill (HR 1833) outlawing a certain late-term abortion procedure. The bill sought to make it a crime for doctors to perform an abortion that involves partially extracting the fetus, terminating it, collapsing its skull and removing it. Defenders say the procedure is used humanely to save the life or good health of the mother, while opponents call it infanticide. As a result of this vote, the veto took effect.

4( A yes vote was to override the veto.

N X Member

* N * Mikulski, Barbara A.D

* N * Sarbanes, Paul S., D

Senate: Shipping Subsidies

By a vote of 88 for and 10 against, the Senate sent the White House a bill (HR 1350) creating a subsidy program for the U.S. maritime industry. The bill authorizes $100 million annually over 10 years for operating costs of approximately 50 merchant vessels that would receive yearly payments of about $2 million each. The U.S.-flag ships would have to be engaged in world commerce and use American crews, and would be on call to the Pentagon during war or some other emergency. The bill also provides loan guarantees to spur construction by U.S. shipbuilding companies.

Supporters said the bill props up the sagging U.S. maritime industry while providing wartime transportation that costs the Pentagon less than if it had to pay for a comparable government fleet. Opponents called the bill "welfare" for politically connected shipbuilders, shipping firms and maritime unions.

0$ A yes vote was to pass the bill.

N X Member

Y * * Mikulski, Barbara A.D

Y * * Sarbanes, Paul S., D

Senate: Lobbying Issue

By a vote of 50 for and 48 against, the Senate tabled (killed) an amendment to HR 1350 (above) to prevent companies receiving shipping subsidies from using any of the money for lobbying, campaign contributions or "public education."

A yes vote opposed the proposed limits on how shipping subsidies may be spent.

Y N X Member

Y * * Mikulski, Barbara A., D

Y * * Sarbanes, Paul S., D

Pub Date: 9/29/96

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