Groundbreaking for a museum and park honoring...

OELLA -- A

September 04, 1996|By From staff reports

OELLA -- A groundbreaking for a museum and park honoring Benjamin Banneker, the self-educated African-American mathematician and inventor from Oella, will be held at 5: 30 p.m. today.

The project will include a 5,900-square-foot visitors center, an exhibit hall and gallery featuring information about Banneker, who lived in Oella from 1731 to 1806. Archaeological digs have unearthed several artifacts from the scientist's homestead.

More than 200 supporters of the Benjamin Banneker Historical Park and Museum are expected to attend today's ceremony, including Baltimore County Executive C. A. Dutch Ruppersberger III and Baltimore County Councilman Stephen G. Sam Moxley, a Catonsville Democrat. The park site is off Oella Avenue, north of the intersection of Oella Avenue and Old Frederick Road.

Man trying to help robbery victim is stabbed

BALTIMORE HIGHLANDS

BALTIMORE HIGHLANDS -- Ronald Baker stepped out of his home as a good Samaritan -- and returned as a stabbing victim.

After his wife saw a pizza delivery man being robbed about 10: 45 p.m. Monday, Baker ran from his home in the 3700 block of Baltimore St. and tried to aid the victim, police said. But as Baker, 38, yelled at one fleeing suspect, a second man stabbed him in the upper chest, left arm and left hand.

Police said Baker, who apparently was cut with a broken bottle used in the robbery of the pizza delivery man, was treated at St. Agnes Hospital and released. Police were searching for the robbers, who escaped with $25 and a pizza.

Ailing canine sees council OK funds for his treatment

TOWSON

TOWSON -- Barney, the county's most famous fire-rescue dog, attended last night's County Council meeting to witness the official acceptance of $43,467 collected to pay for his cancer treatments.

The fund is about $40,000 more than the treatment likely will require. Fire officials say they'll use the extra money to create a fund to help similar dogs in the future and to recruit, train and equip other rescue animals.

The council also voted to accept a donation of three televisions from the television show "Homicide: Life on the Street." The locally produced NBC show used a cellblock in the old county jail in July to film a scene. The televisions will be used in the county's two jails to keep inmates occupied.

Oregon Ridge center to hold nature course for children

HUNT VALLEY

HUNT VALLEY -- Oregon Ridge Nature Center is seeking children ages 9 to 12 for a junior naturalist course to be held Saturdays beginning Sept. 21.

The classes include nature studies, a canoeing trip, a camp-out and a long hike, and will run through Nov. 2 at the county park off Shawan Road.

For information and reservations, call 887-1815.

Police have arrested a St. Paul Street resident in the Sunday morning slaying of a man in a rowhouse.

Harris Sanford Scott was charged with first-degree murder, police said. Spokeswoman Ragina Cooper said that at 9 a.m. Sunday, the man, whose identity police have been unable to determine, was stabbed in Scott's rowhouse in the 1800 block of St. Paul St.

The man was dragged outside the residence and left on the sidewalk, police said. When police arrived, they found Scott sitting on the steps. The two men apparently were friends, Cooper said, but Scott has refused to identify the man.

Woman stabbed to death; police have no suspects

A woman was found stabbed to death in her Northwest Baltimore home early yesterday. Police said detectives have no suspects and know of no motive in the attack.

Officers were called to a two-story brick house in the 2700 block of Ruscombe Lane about 12: 10 a.m. yesterday, where they found the body of Doris Smalls, 29.

Smalls' neighbors said that she had not lived in the house long. The neighborhood -- a suburban-style area of houses with large, well-groomed lawns -- has experienced robberies but little violent crime, residents said.

Pub Date: 9/04/96

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