High-profile style depends on the classics

August 22, 1996|By ELSA KLENSCH | ELSA KLENSCH,Los Angeles Times Syndicate

My husband is a politician, ambitious and successful. But he constantly worries about his image and mine. He keeps telling me we both need to wear more "important" clothes.

I'm a small-busted, fine-boned woman, and I've always had difficulty finding clothes that make me stand out in a crowd. In fact, I'm not so sure what "important" clothes are. What should I be looking for?

New York designer Carolina Herrera dresses many women who are constantly in the public eye. Here's her advice:

"Look for clothes that are classic with a modern touch. Rule out anything that is trendy. In your position, trendy clothes can easily be criticized and will not give you the wear the classics will.

"Carefully study the outfits you consider buying, to make certain they reflect your taste. For the clothes that will make you look important are the ones you are comfortable wearing. Then you will stand tall and carry yourself in a way that will be admired by all."

I'm one of the few female executives in a mostly male company, and because of this I dress conservatively. One of my good features is my hands, and I keep them well groomed and my nails polished. Lately I noticed that dark-red nail lacquer is in fashion. It would be sensational on my long nails, but I hesitate because dark red could also look flashy. What do you think?

I say, try it. Gordon Espinet, makeup artist for MAC, the Canadian company, agrees.

"A woman of your stature should be informed about current events, including fashion," he says. "You should be comfortable enough in yourself to make decisions about what is appropriate for you. Well-manicured nails and dark lips often equate with an image of power. In today's business world, conservative does not mean dull, and that goes for your nails as well."

Pub Date: 8/22/96

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