Former policeman charged in shooting of neighbor's dog Labrador retriever killed with pellet gun as children look on

August 20, 1996|By Melody Simmons | Melody Simmons,SUN STAFF

A former city police officer was charged with cruelty to animals and destruction of property yesterday for allegedly shooting a Middle River neighbor's dog to death with a pellet gun as a group of children looked on in horror.

The children -- many of them crying -- angrily chanted "dog killer" as Baltimore County police arrested Scottie D. McDonald Sr., 57, and drove him away in a patrol car.

County police said he was released last night after posting $10,000 bond.

"The children are still crying," said Stewart L. Martinez of the 400 block of Waters Watch Court, owner of the mixed black Labrador retriever, named Santana after the rock-and-roll band. "They are devastated. My 10-year-old can't believe someone would do something like that to his dog.

"The kids were having a pier fishing party," Martinez said. "Neighbors said they saw him walking over, and he had a stick in one hand and a high-powered pellet gun in the other. And he shot the dog. Why? I have no idea."

Martinez said he had never met McDonald -- identified by county authorities as a former Baltimore police officer -- and did not know if Santana had ever bothered him. "I've never known the dog to be a nuisance to anyone," he said.

Police said county officers surrounded McDonald's house, where he had returned. After about 30 minutes, police said, a woman walked out and denied anyone else was in the house. But soon after, she told police her husband was there, and he was arrested when he walked out of the house, police said.

No one in the McDonald household could be reached for comment last night.

Martinez said his family got the dog four years ago when it was 10 weeks old from the SPCA. The dog loved the water and played with his children as they fished off the backyard pier, he said.

Pub Date: 8/20/96

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