Mel Taylor,63, who helped develop instrumental surf music...

Deaths Elsewhere

August 15, 1996

Mel Taylor,63, who helped develop instrumental surf music as the longtime drummer for the Ventures, died of lung cancer Sunday in Los Angeles. He had been performing with the Ventures in Japan as recently as Aug. 1. Guitarist Don Wilson and bassist Bob Bogle started the group in 1959 in Tacoma, Wash. Mr. Taylor joined about three years later when the original drummer was injured in a car accident.

The Ventures made about 90 albums and are known for their adaptation of "Walk, Don't Run," which reached No. 2 on the pop charts in 1961, and for the theme of the TV series "Hawaii Five-O." Their classic "Surf Rider" was featured in the 1994 film "Pulp Fiction."

Richard Upton,81, creator of New Hampshire's first-in-the-nation presidential primary, died Monday in Portsmouth, N.H.

As a 35-year-old House speaker in 1949, he sparked the idea of a presidential preference primary in New Hampshire.

Until the 1952 primary, voters had chosen delegates to the national political conventions. But beginning that year with the Republican primary of Dwight Eisenhower and Sen. Robert Taft of Ohio, voters picked a candidate.

It took Mr. Upton, a lawyer for more than 50 years, more than three decades to attend his first national convention -- the 1984 Republican affair in New Orleans.

Dr. Robert Bartunek,81, who helped design a pioneering diagnostic tool for gastroenterology, died Friday in Beachwood, Ohio. In the 1940s, he helped design the Eder-Bartunek Gastroscope. Doctors insert it through the patient's mouth to inspect the inside of the stomach. His version was put on display at the Smithsonian Institution in 1971.

Harry Heath,77, a professor emeritus and director of the school of journalism and broadcasting at Oklahoma State University from 1967 to 1982, died Tuesday in Tulsa, Okla.

C. B. Johnson,82, a sculptor featured in numerous public and private collections in the United States and Canada, died Friday in San Francisco. Mr. Johnson, who always went by his initials, was known for works in marble, steel, wood, aluminum and bronze.

Sir Anthony Parsons,73, Britain's ambassador to the United Nations during the 1982 Falklands War, has died, the Foreign Ministry said this week in London.

The career diplomat had to steer Britain through highly sensitive debates and resolutions at the United Nations during the 10-week war that followed Argentina's invasion of the South Atlantic islands.

Viktor Ambartsumyan,87, one of the great figures of Soviet astronomy, died Monday at Byurakan, the observatory he founded in his native Armenia in 1946 and directed until 1988. His work in theoretical astrophysics and stellar astronomy brought him an array of international honors. He had been seriously ill for several months.

Pub Date: 8/15/96

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