Girl, 14, admits role in carjack attempt

August 09, 1996|By Caitlin Francke | Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF

A 14-year-old Anne Arundel girl admitted yesterday in Howard County Juvenile Court that she participated in an attempted carjacking.

The girl could face up to seven years in juvenile detention for her role in the June incident. Held in custody since her arrest, the girl was released to her parents pending sentencing. As she walked out of the courtroom, she clasped her hands together as if in prayer, then hugged her parents. A sentencing date has not been set.

In court, Assistant State's Attorney Sue Ellen Hantman said testimony would have shown that the girl and two others left an Ellicott City drug treatment center about 2 a.m. one day in June. They approached a man, first asking to use his car phone, then asking for a light for a cigarette, Hantman said.

One of the girls -- not the 14-year-old -- told the man she had a gun and demanded the keys to his car, Hantman said. He asked to keep the keys to his apartment, which was nearby. As the girls climbed into the car, he entered his apartment and called police. The girls then fled, Hantman said.

The 14-year-old later called police to tell them about the incident, Hantman said.

Man exposes himself to girls in parking lot

A man exposed himself to three teen-age girls as they walked across a mall parking lot in Ellicott City Wednesday, police said.

Two 13-year-olds and a 15-year-old were walking across the Chatham Mall lot at 1: 50 p.m. when a man asked them a question, said Sgt. Steven Keller of the Howard County Police Department. When the girls turned, the man exposed himself, police said. The girls ran to a friend's house and called police.

The man is described as a white male in his early 40s, 5 feet 10 inches tall, weighing between 190 and 200 pounds, with medium-length dark brown hair, wearing a gray Baltimore Ravens T-shirt and purple cotton shorts.

Pub Date: 8/09/96

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