WJZ names anchors of new show Talent: Weekend morning news program debuts July 20, with Tim Williams and Katie Leahan.

On the Air

June 16, 1996|By Chris Kaltenbach | Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF

WJZ, Channel 13, finally has some faces to go with its foray into the world of weekend morning news shows.

Baltimorean Tim Williams, a general-assignment reporter for the station, will be joined by newcomer Katie Leahan when the weekend show debuts July 20.

Williams, a native of Woodlawn and graduate of Catonsville Community College and Towson State University, started his broadcasting career on radio with stints at WWMD in Hagerstown and WWIN in Baltimore. On television, he worked for WHAG in Hagerstown and WTLV in Jacksonville, Fla., before joining WJZ in November.

Leahan comes to Baltimore from Detroit, where she anchored two newscasts and served as a general assignment reporter for WJBK. She won several awards during her years in Detroit, including a local Emmy in 1989 and a UP/AP award in 1987 for investigative reporting.

The as-yet-unnamed show will air from 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. Saturdays and 7 a.m. to 9 a.m. Sundays, using a format similar to the weekday-morning "Rise & Shine/Morning Edition," with hosts Marty Bass and Don Scott.

WJZ, whose 5 p.m. and 6 p.m. newscasts were top-rated in their respective time periods during the May sweeps, is the last of Baltimore's big-three stations to produce a weekend morning news show.

WBAL, Channel 11, has programs that run from 8 a.m. to 11 a.m. Saturdays and 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Sundays, while WMAR, Channel 2, airs a Sunday news show from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m.

Emmys for WBFF

Channels 13 and 11 may be locked in mortal combat for ratings supremacy when it comes to Baltimore news, but at least as far as awards go, the clear winner this year was WBFF-TV, Channel 45.

The Fox affiliate won an impressive 13 Emmys at last weekend's awards ceremony for stations in Maryland, Virginia and Washington. That baker's-dozen total placed it second overall, behind only the 19 Emmys awarded Washington's WRC, Channel 4.

WBFF's big night included wins for its 10 p.m. news show and for news segments featuring reporters Denise Saunders (three Emmys), Kathleen Calms and Ernie Freeman.

Other winners from Baltimore included WJZ news anchor Denise Koch; WMAR's "The Colored Cyclone" for Public Affairs Program and reporter Keith Cate and producer John Ehrhart for Investigative Reporting; and MPT's "Kid-Vid Field Trip" to the National Aquarium for Children's Programming and "Rapture of the Deep" for Documentary.

WMAR ended up with a total of seven Emmys, while WJZ and MPT walked away with three each.

AP award

And the awards for WBFF don't end there. The station also has just won the Associated Press' Outstanding News Operation award for the second year in a row. The congrats just keep rolling in.

Family values

Ever wonder if the TV show you're watching is destroying your family values?

Could be, if you're watching "Friends," "Married With Children," "Cybill" or any of the other shows ranked as the 10 least "family-friendly" shows by the Alexandria-based Media Research Center.

The chief offenders, ranked in order of worst to not-quite-as-awful, were "Married With Children" ("the crudest comedy on prime-time television"), "Friends" ("promotes gay parenting and same-sex marriages as viable options"), "Roseanne" ("Religion and the religious are mocked"), "Melrose Place" ("Melrose's randy regulars are constantly in and out of one another's beds") and the CBS movie "A Season in Purgatory" (which featured a seemingly devout Catholic family who were really anything but).

Also among the worst were "Central Park West" ("The series was so poorly acted and written that very few viewers tuned in to its sordidness"), "The Dana Carvey Show" ("obscenity-laden skits and extremely crude content"), "Cybill" ("The sitcom's regulars frequently belittle the institution of marriage"), "Beverly Hills, 90210" ("premarital sex as a natural -- and completely inconsequential -- fact of college life") and "Martin" ("dialogue fraught with sexual references and obscene language").

The group's most "family-friendly" shows were, in order, "Touched by an Angel," "Second Noah," "Kirk," "Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman," "Home Improvement," "Lois & Clark: The Adventures of Superman" and "The Parent 'Hood."

Pub Date: 6/16/96

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