A '20s look puts retro in its place Fashion: Long skirts, three-quarter coats, shiny leather and less hair are starting to look like essentials for fall.

April 02, 1996|By Vida Roberts | Vida Roberts,SUN FASHION EDITOR

NEW YORK -- Energy at last. After seven days of countless runway shows devoted to '70s retro, a new decade breaks the sameness. The '20s roared down Anna Sui's runway in the shape of supermodels Linda, Nadja, Naomi and Shalom, who have kept themselves scarce during the week of fall fashion collections here.

New York's hip, downtown diva saw that the bin of thrift-shop chic ideas has been picked clean and she stepped up to an older vintage style.

English eccentrics were her inspiration, and she mixed plaids, tweeds, laces and velvets with the abandon of a nanny on speed.

Nanny and granny trappings looked fresh and young -- hats with full-blown pheasants and peacocks, Mary Poppins knitting bags and needlepoint purses.

No nannies for Cynthia Rowley, thank you. This thoroughly modern mom showed cuddly cable sweaters, fluffy mohair shifts, lean and sleek leather pants and huge multi-screen pictures of her new baby boy.

With two more days of designer shows yet to come, fall's must-haves are falling into place. Look to:

Long skirts. The best are cut near the ankle with deep slits for leg and motion.

The three-quarter coats as jackets of a pantsuit and toppers of a dress. The hem hanging below a short coat is now desirable. There's short, too, but you already have that.

Shiny leather. It's being shown in coats, pants, dresses, evening gowns and bras. What happens with frequent wearing is anybody's guess.

Smaller hair. Stylists are simply slicking it back or pulling it up into a bun with fly-away strands.

High-shine, high-heeled and high-cut boots. Clunker utility boots have stepped out of the picture.

Pub Date: 4/02/96

Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.