Redskins agree to limit pro stadium events Move is concession to Orioles' concerns

March 15, 1996|By Jon Morgan | Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Thomas W. Waldron contributed to this article.

The Redskins have agreed to hold no more than 25 professional sports events a year at their proposed stadium at Landover a stipulation sought by the Orioles to keep a rival baseball team out of the state.

The team also has agreed to provide free sky boxes for the governor, who was very supportive of the stadium project, and the county executive, who was less so.

An agreement reached Tuesday among the state, team and county cleared the way for $70 million in state and county funding for roads, sewers and other infrastructure around the stadium site.

Although there is no overall limit to how many events may be held at the Landover stadium, there is a cap on the number of professional sporting events. Of the 25, 10 likely will be Redskins games eight regular-season home games and two preseason.

There is no limit to the number of non-sporting events.

"I think there was thought to be a need to limit the number of events there and this was one way of doing it," said Redskins attorney/lobbyist Gerard Evans.

Orioles lobbyist Alan M. Rifkin said the franchise requested limitations to avoid having a competing baseball team so close.

"They recognize that there's reason to assure the continued vitality of Oriole Park and the Orioles. It goes a long way to answering our concerns," Rifkin said of the limit.

The agreement also calls for free sky boxes for Prince George's County and the governor.

"It's for the whole county government's use. My understanding is that these are common for economic development and that there will be ones for the county and governor," said Glenda Wilson, a spokeswoman for Prince George's County Executive Wayne K. Curry.

Community groups are fighting the Landover stadium, and will seek a court order to block construction until the legality of the county's zoning process is settled in court, said Stan Brown, an attorney representing the Coalition of Central Prince George's County Community Associations.

"We are on very firm legal ground. The county made a number of mistakes when it did this," Brown said.

Pub Date: 3/15/96

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