Marriott plans all-suite line with larger rooms, amenities Economy, spaciousness for business travelers

March 07, 1996|By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS

NEW YORK -- Marriott International Inc. plans to franchise an all-suite limited-service hotel line under its Fairfield Inn brand for business travelers who want bigger rooms and more in them.

The new hotel line, unveiled at a news conference yesterday, is the second lodging product unveiled by Bethesda, Md.-based Marriott since the beginning of the year. The new hotels, which will be called Fairfield Suites, will have rooms that are 25 percent larger than Fairfield Inn rooms. They also will have more amenities, including a pantry area, refrigerator, microwave and a second phone. Guests will pay $55 to $65 a night, compared with $45 to $50 at a Fairfield Inn.

"We really think this niche of the economy suite is an under-served market," said Mike Moriarty, brand vice president for Fairfield Inn. "This is a niche to be exploited."

Mr. Moriarty said that, while the notion of an all-suite economy hotel may sound like an oxymoron, there is real demand among budget-conscious guests who plan to stay more than just a night and want roomier accommodations.

The all-suite hotels will be positioned a notch above a Fairfield Inn and a step below Marriott's other limited-service brand -- Courtyard. Limited-service hotels generally don't offer room service or restaurant dining.

The introduction of Fairfield Suites further crowds the limited-service segment of the market, where hotel franchisers such as HFS Inc., Hilton Hotels Corp. and Manor Care Inc.'s Choice Hotels International have all introduced brands in recent months.

Just last month, Marriott itself said it would spend $25 million on the first five hotels of a new mid-price extended-stay hotel brand.

Marriott said it plans to franchise 80 to 100 Fairfield Suites, all of which will be new construction, over the next five years.

Pub Date: 3/07/96

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