Mount Airy Garden Club making arrangements for its flower show

NEIGHBORS

March 01, 1996|By Christy Kruhm | Christy Kruhm,SPECIAL TO THE SUN

THESE DAYS, we're all eagerly looking for any sign of spring. The calendar tells us winter is almost over, and stores are stocked with Easter goodies and spring clothes. But the weather outside seems to be an endless parade of cold, gray, drizzly days.

Mount Airy Garden Club is taking advantage of these last winter days to prepare for its long-awaited flower show later this year. Club members are planning and preparing their gardens, studying and experimenting with new growing techniques and visiting gardens in the area.

The club, which is marking its 61st year, meets year-round and has an active membership of 20. Part of the Federated Garden Club of Maryland and the National Council of State Garden Clubs, the local club is led by President Helen Hawthorne.

Monthly meetings and activities focus on fostering the understanding of gardens as a place of enjoyment, practicing horticulture and conservation methods, and recognizing native plants and birds.

It's not uncommon to find club members traveling across the area, viewing one another's gardens and the larger, more formal gardens in the mid-Atlantic region. They plan to visit the Winterthur Gardens in Delaware later this month.

A junior gardening club is available for elementary school children who have an interest in flowers and gardens. Carol VanGosen and Marilyn Potter are chairwomen of Young Gardeners.

Participating in local Earth Day celebrations and conservation efforts, the club has been instrumental in beautification projects in the Mount Airy area, including a mass planting of daffodils along Route 27 at the Interstate 70 interchange.

Recently, club members have become involved in teaching a flower workshop at Mount Airy Senior Center. The series of five workshops allows the members to work closely with seniors in creating seasonal arrangements and displays.

This month, the club will meet at the senior center to work on tray favors, which will be donated to Carroll County General Hospital to decorate patients' meal trays.

The flower show, called "A Novel Idea," is the garden club's first show in many years.

Scheduled for Aug. 22 at Mount Airy Public Library, it will feature horticultural design entries and exhibits from club members and junior club members.

Gladys Hemphill, a local accredited judge with the National Council of State Garden Clubs, has been invited to set guidelines and judge entries. The flower show is free and open to the public.

For membership information, call (410) 795-3369. For additional show information, call (301) 829-9619.

Spring fashion show

The latest spring fashions will displayed when the Ladies Auxiliary of the Winfield Community Volunteer Fire Department holds a fashion show April 17.

Fashions for men, women and children will be featured, along with a buffet dinner, entertainment and door prizes.

The event will begin at 6:30 p.m. at the firehouse. Tickets, which cost $15, are being sold only in advance. For information or tickets, call (410) 875-2365.

Bingo banquet

Winfield Fire Department is sponsoring an All-day Bingo Banquet on April 27, beginning at 1 p.m. Doors open at noon, and lunch will be available.

Ticket purchases include bingo cards for each game, a door prize ticket and dinner. Ticket prices are $25 in advance and $30 at the door.

For additional information and advance ticket sales, call (410) 549-9476.

Spring volleyball

Woodbine Recreation Council is seeking men and women interested in playing in its Spring Volleyball League.

Games begin March 27 and will be held Wednesdays at South Carroll High School. The co-educational league has six players on a team; they must be at least 18 years old.

For more information or to register, call 635-2684.

Christy Kruhm's Southwest Carroll Neighborhood column appears each Friday in the Carroll County edition of The Sun.

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