North County eliminates Old Mill with 52-44 triumph Knights overcome deficit of 10 in first quarter

February 27, 1996|By Steven Kivinski | Steven Kivinski,CONTRIBUTING WRITER

Before the tip-off of last night's Class 4A East regional quarterfinal, North County coach Sally Entsminger presented Old Mill coach Pat Chance with a bouquet of flowers for reaching the 400-victory milestone last week.

Then, Entsminger's Knights gave Chance the rest of the season off.

After falling behind by 10 points in the first quarter, visiting North County swarmed the ball and the boards before eliminating the Patriots, 52-44.

The victory -- the Knights' sixth straight -- earned North County a berth in tomorrow's region semifinal, in which it will face the winner of today's 5 p.m. matchup between Chesapeake-AA and Meade.

"They really felt like they could finish the season the way they should have played all season and I think they're starting to believe in themselves a little bit," said Entsminger, after watching her team improve to .500 (11-11). "We've got five kids out there that can put the ball in the basket at any time and they're not looking for a single individual. They're really trying to look for each other and it makes a big difference."

Alison Sabo led the Knights with 13 points and teammates Kiesha Naylor and Shante Williams chipped in 12 apiece.

Seneka Blackwell scored a game-high 20 points for Old Mill, which was held scoreless for the last four minutes of the second quarter and scored only two points during a span that stretched from the second to third quarter.

"We went away from what we've worked on and North County really played tough defense," said Chance, whose career record now stands at 401-142. "North County played well and they intimidated us a little bit so they should get all the credit."

The Knights crept back into the game in the second quarter and pulled to within one at the half on a basket by Stephanie Sachs. North County allowed Old Mill (13-10) to score first early in the second half but then scored eight straight points and led 34-28 heading into the fourth.

The Patriots closed to within four when Jessica Baker threw a long pass to Jamie Smith for a wide- open layup, but Williams answered with two straight field goals to return the margin to eight.

Old Mill pulled to within six on two occasions down the stretch but some solid free throw shooting (10 of 15) by the Knights ended the threat.

Things weren't looking so grim for the Patriots in the first quarter as Blackwell and Stephanie Parker led Old Mill on a 10-2 run that put the hosts ahead 18-10 after one quarter.

"We came out a little rusty, but we turned it on after awhile," said Sabo, who scored seven of her points during the pivotal third quarter. "We have a lot of heart and we just go and play our best."

* South River 90, Forest Park 40: Adria Lewnes scored a season-high 20 points and grabbed 10 rebounds to pace the host Seahawks (8-16) over the Foresters in a Class 2A East game. Jess Marion added 19 points for South River.

* C. Milton Wright 68, Franklin 49: Erin Updegrove scored 26 points as the No. 4 Mustangs (20-0) defeated the Indians in a Class 3A North game. Miranda James added 15 points for C. Milton Wright.

* Fallston 49, Parkville 39: Karen Tiedemann scored 16 to lead the No. 6 Cougars (15-2) past the Knights (15-8) in a 3A North game. Fallston thwarted a late Parkville rally after a 14-point halftime lead was cut to seven with four minutes left.

* Catonsville 73, Overlea 19: Meghan Mohler scored 23 points to help the No. 8 Comets (20-2) past the host Falcons in a Class 2A North game.

* Poly 57, City 31: Lindsay Willemain had 12 points and 18 rebounds as the No. 12 Engineers (19-3) defeated the visiting Knights in a Class 2A East game. Jawai Maith added 13 points and eight steals.

* Milford Mill 67, Patapsco 31: Akialh Crowner scored 12 points as the No. 16 Millers (23-2) topped the visiting Patriots in a Class 2A North game.

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