Go ahead, let your diet walk on the 'bad' side

Eating Well

February 27, 1996|By Colleen Pierre | Colleen Pierre,SPECIAL TO THE SUN

Are you ready to eat some bad food? You know, the kind that tastes really good, but makes you fat, clogs your arteries or raises your blood sugar?

Actually, there is no one food capable of creating physiological havoc all by itself. As the American Dietetic Association often points out, there are no good foods and no bad foods. There are only good and bad diets.

Of course, there are some foods we need to be really careful with, like eggs, fatty meats and chocolate. But all those favorites can fit, even on weight control diets or eating plans designed to manage heart disease or diabetes.

Take eggs, for instance. Although they are an inexpensive source of the highest quality protein, they are high in cholesterol. For a small percentage of people, they will slightly raise blood cholesterol levels if eaten to excess. But the American Heart Association says, even on a cholesterol-lowering diet, you can eat four real eggs, including the yolks, each week.

So why not relax and enjoy them? After a breakfast week of whole grain cereal, fruit and skim milk, try a Saturday or Sunday cook-in of two poached or soft boiled eggs, two slices of whole grain toast with jam, and a grapefruit half, for a change of pace.

Remember, the U.S. Dietary Guidelines for Americans emphasize variety as the key to good nutrition. That applies to beef, too.

The great shift toward less fatty beef and more chicken is a great, heart-healthy move. But a little beef now and then can easily fit in a well-balanced diet. Even the Asian and Mediterranean pyramids concede that beef once a month works just fine. So on your beefy splurge night, enjoy the real thing.

And if you want a real chocolate diet, there's a plan for that, too!

Colleen Pierre, a registered dietitian, is the nutrition consultant at the Union Memorial Sports Medicine Center and Vanderhorst & Associates in Baltimore.

Two diets

Here's a well-balanced, weight-loss diet day that gets less than 20 percent of its calories from fat, yet includes a generous serving of beef. And, for a chocolate-lover's diet, keep breakfast and lunch the same, but have this dinner instead:

WOMEN (1,600 calories, 35 gm fat)

BREAKFAST

1 cup Frosted Mini Wheats

(or other fat-free cereal)

1.5 cups Frosted Mini Wheats

1 medium banana

1 cup skim milk

LUNCH

1 cup black bean soup

1 slice multigrain bread

1 cup nonfat yogurt

(artificially sweetened)

1 tangerine

DINNER

6 ounces broiled beef tenderloin

1 medium baked potato

1 tablespoon real sour cream

1 cup broccoli and cauliflower

with herbs and fresh lemon

salad* tossed with

1 teaspoon olive oil and

2 teaspoons balsamic vinegar

5 ounces dry red wine

1 cup fresh strawberries

CHOCOLATE LOVER'S DIET

3 ounces turkey breast cutlet*

1 cup steamed white or brown rice

1/2 cup unsweetened cinnamon applesauce

salad as above

5 ounces dry white wine

3 Godiva or other rich chocolates

*Salad: 2 cups romaine lettuce, 1 chopped fresh tomato, chopped slice raw onion; broil turkey breast cutlet with honey Dijon barbecue sauce.

MEN (2,200 calories, 50 gm fat)

BREAKFAST

1 medium banana

1 cup skim milk

LUNCH

2 cups black bean soup

2 slices multigrain bread

1 cup yogurt

(artificially sweetened)

1 tangerine

DINNER

8 ounces broiled beef tenderloin 1 large baked potato

2 tablespoons real sour cream

1 cup broccoli and cauliflower

with herbs and fresh lemon

salad* tossed with

2 teaspoons olive oil and

2 teaspoons balsamic vinegar

5 ounces dry red wine

1 cup fresh strawberries

CHOCALATE LOVER'S DIET

6 ounces turkey breast cutlet*

1 1/2 cup steamed white or brown rice

1 cup unsweetened cinnamon applesauce

salad as above

5 ounces dry white wine

3 Godiva or other rich chocolates

*Salad: 2 cups romaine lettuce, 1 chopped fresh tomato, chopped slice raw onion; broil turkey breast cutlet with honey Dijon barbecue sauce.

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