'Prospect' wins another stakes race Laurel's $60,000 Jameela is a breeze for fast filly

February 11, 1996|By Kent Baker | Kent Baker,SUN STAFF

How good can Secret Prospect get?

Pretty darned good, it appears.

Conover Stable's dark brown filly added another jewel to her growing collection yesterday, winning as she pleased against four rivals in the $60,000 Jameela Stakes at Laurel Park.

It was her fourth stakes victory in her last five starts, the exception being a defeat by a neck to Ontherightwicket in the Maryland Juvenile Fillies Championship Dec. 23.

Jockey C. H. Marquez Jr. guided Secret Prospect to an unhurried lead and thoroughly controlled the six-furlong race, winning in 1 minute, 11 4/5 seconds.

"She's unbelievable right now," said Marquez. "She broke real well and wanted to pull me to the front, but I had to slow her down and she responded immediately.

"She is doing it so easy. Coming back after the race, she wants to keep going. There's no telling how good she can be."

A 1-to-9 favorite, Secret Prospect paid only $2.20 to win.

Trainer John Tammaro III said the filly's next start will probably be in a month in the $60,000 Politely Stakes at Laurel.

"I hope the fans are enjoying this as much as we are," said Tammaro. "She's a super horse to train . . . does everything easily and perfectly and obviously loves her job."

Second choice Yes Dear finished second, 3 1/2 lengths behind the winner, after being steadied briefly by jockey Joe Rocco.

"My horse just got herself settled and was running some in the stretch," said Rocco.

"Now, I'm not going to say she was going to catch the winner because he [Marquez] was just easing her all the way. But I think when races get longer, my horse is going to be better."

NOTE: Today's feature is the $50,000-added Horatius Stakes for 3-year-olds with Viv and Irish Cloud hooking up again.

They finished second and third behind In Contention in the Dancing Count Stakes last time out.

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