2 children die of injuries suffered in fire 3 other youths remain in critical condition

February 01, 1996|By Peter Hermann | Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF

Two children who were critically injured in Tuesday's fire on East Biddle Street have died and three others continued to cling to life yesterday as investigators tried to pinpoint how the blaze began.

Desean Martin-Bailey, 3, was pronounced dead at 11:50 p.m. Tuesday at the Johns Hopkins Children's Center. His brother, Trevon Jackson, 10 months, died at the same hospital at 4 a.m. yesterday.

A Baltimore Fire Department spokesman said that one of the dead children had suffered burns on more than 70 percent of his body. Two other children who remained in critical condition yesterday were burned on nearly 100 percent of their bodies, the spokesman said. Fire officials warned that the death toll could rise.

Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke yesterday commended Ted Sutton, who broke out a window of the house with a baseball bat and helped the fire victims. He burned his hand picking up Trevon Jackson.

"I didn't do it for the recognition," said Mr. Sutton, who received a plaque from the mayor. "I saw a need, and I had to intervene."

Meanwhile, fire investigators were waiting to interview survivors from the house in the 100 block of E. Biddle St. before announcing an exact cause. They said yesterday that the fire started accidentally in a front first-floor room.

Nine people were injured -- six children and three adults.

Tiffany Miller, 6, was in critical condition at the children's center yesterday. Her brother, Delvon McKoy, 1, was in fair condition at the same hospital. Sharon Peterson, 38, has been discharged from Johns Hopkins.

Erica Page, 10, and Jacqueline McKoy, 21, were in critical condition yesterday at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center. William Jackson, 31, was in fair condition at the Maryland Shock Trauma Center. Tiara Jackson, 10, was in critical condition at the University of Maryland Medical Center.

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