One good turn brings another

January 05, 1996|By Sylvia Badger

MOVIE PRODUCER and prominent horse owner Albert "Cubby" Broccoli received such great care while receiving treatment at Johns Hopkins Hospital that he and his wife, Dana, decided to show their gratitude with money. The Broccolis, best known for producing the James Bond film series, gave $1 million to the Wilmer Eye Clinic for cataract surgery and corneal diseases and $1 million to create the Dana and Albert Broccoli Center for Aortic Surgery at Hopkins.

Baltimore on film

"Twelve Monkeys" opens here today. I am told that you may not recognize the Baltimore places in the film, because most of the exteriors were shot in Philadelphia and most of the interiors in Baltimore, with the most recognizable being the Engineering Society. If you check out the credits, you'll see thanks were expressed to Mike Styer, Jack Gerbes and Catherine Coucill of the Maryland Film Commission.

Styer says that there's not much to report about future films, but he should know in a couple of weeks whether Baltimore will be selected as the location for a pilot for another dramatic TV series. With the success of NBC's "Homicide" series, the word is out that Maryland is an economical, friendly place to work.

Stan Stubble

When Channel 2 news anchor Stan Stovall returned from vacation with a beard, the telephone calls and e-mail messages began pouring in. The station is calling it a "Save it or Shave it" poll. The results will be announced on the 5 p.m. news show today and Stan has agreed to live with the verdict. Hmm, wonder if that means he'll shave on the air, if it's a slow news day.

Worthy recipients

For many years, the JCPenney Co. has rewarded volunteers from all over the country with its annual Golden Rule Volunteer Awards. Last year, two of Maryland's four winners, 14-year-old Megan Leaf, creator of Love Boxes Ltd., and Mike and Della Polk, founders of Roads to Recovery, went on to win two of only four national awards.

Ms. Leaf, a Johns Hopkins Children's Center patient and "Patient Ambassador," created and delivered more than 1,000 "Love Boxes" filled with games, gifts and toys to help children pass time during long hospital stays. She won a $5,000 scholarship and $5,000 for her organization. The Polks founded Roads to Recovery, after their 9-year-old son, Christopher, died of cancer. Their organization won $10,000, which helps them continue their work with families of seriously ill children, who do not have the money to pay for incidental costs not covered by insurance.

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