After ratings famine, Browns have a feast against Steelers

Media Watch

November 30, 1995|By Milton Kent

The Thanksgiving weekend, usually the biggest weekend of football watching, meant bigger ratings numbers locally for all, including the soon-to-be relocated Browns.

The program looks at the case of Nebraska running back Law

rence Phillips, who faces charges of assault from an alleged zTC attack on his former girlfriend, a women's basketball player. Included is a shocking segment in which Florida State football players essentially exonerate Phillips' conduct.

The show's most powerful story is of former boxer Jerry Quarry, a heavyweight of renown who fought Muhammad Ali and Joe Frazier in the early 1970s.

Quarry, once a vibrant fighter, is now 50, punch-drunk, and, having squandered $2 million in earnings, lives off a monthly $614 government check and his brother's kindness.

Giving credit

A belated tip of the cap to Channel 2's Keith Mills for breaking the story Sunday night that Pat Gillick would be joining the Orioles as general manager. As per usual, Mills worked his contacts and came out with a good story.

By the same token, what was Gillick thinking when he stretched the truth to reporters asking if he was coming to Baltimore? Here's the way the game works, Pat: If someone asks you a question you can't answer, just say you can't answer it rather than prevaricating. It makes it far easier to trust you in the future.

Hear the Thunder

So, you say you want to be a big-time radio play-by-play announcer? Well, the Baltimore Thunder may have something in store for you.

The indoor lacrosse team has five home games that will be broadcast on WJFK (1300 AM) starting Dec. 30, but no one to call the action, thus the need for an open audition.

To toss your hat in the ring, send a tape and a cover letter by Dec. 13 (serious applicants only, please) to Edie Brown, Baltimore Arena, 201 W. Baltimore St., Baltimore, MD, 21201.

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