Young troupe is moving right along

November 09, 1995|By J. L. Conklin | J. L. Conklin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN

The Moving Company under the artistic direction of Nancy Wanich-Romita presented a program of seven works on Saturday at the Baltimore Museum of Art. On the program were the premieres of Ms. Wanich-Romita's "Medieval Vision" and "Sight," as well as "Circa Sixtyfive" by guest performer Scott Rink.

Ms. Wanich-Romita often constructs her works on specific ideas. In "Medieval Vision," the source of the dance's inspiration is Hildegaard of Bingen, a 12th-century nun who was an herbalist, poet, composer and mystic.

With conscientious performances by Tracie Burton, Phil Couch, Laura LaGreca, Colette Shrimpton, Joy Stauber and Dana J. Martin, the work seemed contemplative. Even when the women were dancing in unison, it felt as if they were performing solos. Yet for all the dance's fine points -- and there were many, including a strong musicality and Ms. Wanich-Romita's dramatic tenacity -- the work could use some editing to trim some excess and repetition.

Ms. Wanich's other new endeavor, "Sight," explored the world of those without sight. Ms. LaGreca, Ms. Martin, Ms. Shrimpton and Ms. Stauber danced with their eyes closed. Ms. Burton, employing a cane, moved though their tentative groupings.

Yet there was an over-reliance on rudimentary choreography: Presenting two widely spaced duets is a convention that is cliched and serves to nullify the subject.

Scott Rink's blast into the past, "Circa Sixtyfive," was a satirical look at an eternal triangle, with dancers Dana Martin and Laura LaGreca literally hanging on to the hapless Mr. Rink.

Oddly, despite the easy-to-dance-to music of the Supremes, only Mr. Rink danced. The two women moved but never really connected with the music, while Mr. Rink underlined its rhythms, whether he was rolling across the floor or squashed between the two women, who hung on him for dear life.

Ms. Romita's "This Thing Called Love Wallflower Waltz" and "The Loveberg Variations" proved that her wit is keen and her dances lively. Overall, the performance of these and the other works on the program by this young company shows improvement and a promise of good things to come.

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