Drumstick may be best part of veal

Recipe Finder

November 01, 1995|By Ellen Hawks | Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF

Take dinner to a new high with veal birds. Orene Todd of Towson requested the recipe, which "I believe is veal pounded thin and bread stuffing piled on. The concoction was rolled and fastened with a toothpick and it resembled a chicken drumstick minus the bone," she wrote.

Similar responses offered some variations. Chef Gilles Syglowski chose one from Leah, no address, who wrote. "This came from my very first cookbook which I purchased in 1960 for $6.95 called the "Ladies' Home Journal Cookbook, New and Basic Recipes."

Leah's veal birds

1 1/2 pounds veal cutlet sliced thin

1 cup soft bread crumbs

1 tablespoon chopped parsley

1 tablespoon chopped onion

1 teaspoon salt

3/8 teaspoon pepper

1/2 teaspoon poultry seasoning

3 tablespoons melted butter

3 tablespoons flour

2 tablespoons shortening

3/4 cup chicken broth

3/8 cup water

Pound slices of veal very thin and cut into 6 or 8 serving pieces. To the bread crumbs, add parsley, onion, 1/2 teaspoon salt, 1/8 teaspoon pepper and poultry seasoning. Moisten with butter. Place a spoonful on each piece of veal and roll up. Secure with toothpicks. Roll the veal birds in flour seasoned with the remainder of the salt and pepper and brown well in hot shortening. Add the broth and water, cover and simmer over low heat for 30 to 40 minutes until meat is tender. Remove the toothpicks before serving. Thicken the pan gravy if you wish with a little of the seasoned flour.

Joyce Gann of Bend, Ore., and Linda Cromwell of Bel Air offered some variations. Instead of adding broth and water after browning, Ms. Gann added 1 can of cream of mushroom soup mixed with 1/2 cup of water and simmered about an hour or until meat is tender.

Mrs. Cromwell used milk or water and baked the veal birds in a moderate oven (350 degrees) for 1 hour. She also noted that instead of stuffing, the veal could be wrapped around sausage, whole cooked carrots, meatballs or a mixture of chopped pickles, olives and thin beet strips. Also a sage or onion stuffing may be preferred.

A request from Tina, Terry, MaryJo and Mary, computer operators at the U.S. Naval Academy, for a punch-bowl cake brought a grand response. Chef Syglowski chose the recipe of Nancy Smith of Baltimore.

Smith's punch-bowl cake

1 angel food cake

1 large box instant vanilla pudding

2 bananas, sliced

2 cans strawberry pie filling

1 large can sliced peaches, drained

1 cup coconut

1 large container of Cool Whip

Make pudding according to directions on package. Cut cake in quarters. Crumble 1/2 of cake in bottom of a punch bowl. Add 1/2 pudding and then half the bananas, pie filling, peaches and coconut. Crumble the remaining cake on top and make another layer of the banana, pie filling, peaches and coconut. Spread Cool Whip on top; chill and serve.

Recipe requests

Jane Stricklen of Baltimore writes "I still salivate when I think of enjoying a shrimp salad sandwich on toasted cheese bread at the Hutzler's Tea Room. I believe Hutzler's made this bread. I wonder if it is out there anywhere."

Sharon Owens of Baltimore wants two recipes. "One is a fried mushroom recipe similar to the one available at TGI Fridays. I tried different breadings and oil temperatures but it doesn't come out right. Also my husband and I love the sweet black bread served at the Steak and Ale."

Mrs. John Wolf of Baltimore wants a recipe for cream-puff shells.

Chef Syglowski, with the help of chefs and students at the Baltimore International Culinary College, tested these recipes.

If you are looking for a recipe or can answer a request for a long-gone recipe, maybe we can help. Write to Ellen Hawks, Recipe Finder, The Sun, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore 21278.

If you send in more than one recipe, put each on a separate sheet of paper with your name, address and phone number. Please note the number of servings which each recipe makes.

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