Woman given 6-year sentence in claims fraud Insurers lost $30,000 paying for false bills

October 26, 1995|By John Rivera | John Rivera,SUN STAFF

A 55-year-old Woodlawn woman was sentenced to six years in prison yesterday for her role in a scheme that defrauded several insurance companies of $30,000 using false medical claims.

The sentence was unusually stiff because she was prosecuted under a state law passed last year that made insurance fraud of more than $300 a felony and provided for prison terms of up to 15 years and fines of up to $10,000.

The Maryland Insurance Administration's Insurance Fraud Division investigated the case with the Baltimore County state's attorney's office and the National Insurance Crime Bureau.

Dorothy Savage of the first block of Greenbury Court was sentenced in Baltimore County Circuit Court to seven years in prison with one year suspended.

She was accused of submitting fraudulent medical records and bills that supposedly documented treatment she received for injuries from falls or car accidents.

She received the sentence after she agreed to plead guilty to one count of theft of more than $300, in connection with the supposed treatment. The charge was among 10 charges related to phony treatments.

According to court records, Savage was accused of obtaining the names of patients at Johns Hopkins Hospital, where she worked, and of altering the records to indicate that she or her son, Floyd Pryor, had received the treatment.

Savage also was charged with one count of theft in connection with the purchase of cars from auto dealers, in which she is alleged to have used the personal information of people with names similar to hers to secure car loans. She was accused of getting the information through her job. She is alleged to have made no payments on the loans, and the cars were repossessed.

Mr. Pryor will stand trial on similar charges on Nov. 8 in Baltimore County Circuit Court.

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