Robby Cicero Robinson, 45, high school business teacher

October 23, 1995|By Jonathan Bor | Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF

Robby Cicero Robinson, a teacher who prepared students in Anne Arundel County for careers in business, died Wednesday of pneumonia at his home in Baltimore. He was 45.

Mr. Robinson took an early retirement because of illness last year from Arundel High School, where he had taught business education for 10 years. Before that, he taught at Andover, Meade, Glen Burnie and Old Mill senior highs.

He worked a total of 24 years at the four schools, teaching computer science, typing and calculating skills. Many of his students did internships at retail outlets while they were in school.

"He expected the best from his kids, and he gave the best," recalled Nadine Dow, a friend who taught with him at Old Mill. Ms. Dow said Mr. Robinson willingly stayed after school to help students and fellow teachers.

Mr. Robinson was an active member of Memorial Episcopal Church in Bolton Hill, where he was an usher and sang in the choir.

He was an enthusiastic traveler, having toured extensively in the United States and Europe. He regularly attended concerts of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, and participated in political campaigns.

"People knew him and loved him," said his friend Willie Hill, a cameraman at WJZ-TV, Channel 13. "If he had a party at his home, everybody was welcome. He loved making people feel comfortable. If you were needy, he was there to give."

He was born in Scotland Neck, N.C., where he attended Brawley High School. He received his bachelor's degree from Shaw University in Raleigh, N.C., and did graduate work at Loyola College and the University of Maryland.

Services will be held at 10:30 a.m. today at Memorial Episcopal Church, Bolton Street and Lafayette Avenue.

Survivors include his parents, Louise and Cicero Robinson of Scotland Neck; four brothers, Earl Bazemore of Seaside, Calif., Ira Robinson of Rocky Mount, N.C., Maurice Robinson of Clinton and Louis Robinson of Fort Washington; and several nieces and nephews.

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