Cornwall, penalties drop Bandits, 6-3 Baltimore gives up four power-play goals

October 22, 1995|By Todd Hambleton | Todd Hambleton,SPECIAL TO THE SUN

CORNWALL, Ontario -- The Baltimore Bandits found a team they could identify with when they came to Canada last night to play the Cornwall Aces, who, like the Bandits had one victory.

But the Bandits remained the team with one win, losing for the sixth time in eight games this season, 6-3, before 2,467 at Cornwall Civic Complex.

These teams have similar records and the same problem: scoring goals. Last night though, Baltimore's biggest problem was penalties. They were assessed 52 of 92 penalty minutes, and Cornwall took advantage with four power-play goals. On five occasions, the Aces had two-man advantages, and they

connected twice.

"It's a real lack of discipline, and it's been a ongoing thing," said Bandits head coach Walt Kyle. "In a lot of cases its the older, veteran players who are taking the dumb penalties. They should know better."

This was a bad time to be undisciplined. Anchoring Cornwall's power play -- which has been weak so far this season -- defenseman Anders Myrvold and Janne Laukkanen. They were both playing their first game for the Aces this season and were, until recently, with the parent Colorado Avalanche.

Laukkanen capped a string of four consecutive Cornwall power-play goals, scoring at 3:50 of the third period to put the Aces ahead 6-2.

Both teams were out of character in the second period, when Cornwall scored four of its six goals scored to increase its lead to 5-2.

Tied 2-2, Cornwall got consecutive power-play goals from Erik Veilleux -- his second of the period -- at 9:11, Chris Matte (15:02) and Paxton Schulte (17:21).

Steven King, on a power play, and Jeremy Stevenson scored earlier in the second period for Baltimore.

The Bandits "were very undisciplined," Aces coach Bob Hartley said. "That's good for us. I don't mind that at all."

Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.