Green Terror looks to pass past Dickinson

October 11, 1995|By GLENN P. GRAHAM | GLENN P. GRAHAM,SUN STAFF

The Western Maryland College football team has a big task ahead Saturday afternoon when it travels to Carlisle, Pa., to take on the seven-time defending Centennial Conference champion Dickinson Red Devils.

The last time the Green Terror left the Dickinson campus victorious was in 1983 with a 35-14 win. The Red Devils since have won five straight at home against the Green Terror.

A bye last Saturday gave Western Maryland (3-1-1 overall, 2-0-1 in the CC) an extra week to prepare, while Dickinson (4-1, 2-0) got past Franklin & Marshall, 28-21, despite being out-gained, 453-301, in total yards.

The difference was in turnovers -- Franklin & Marshall committed five to Dickinson's one.

Another number of interest is the 392 yards Franklin & Marshall gained through the air against the Dickinson defense.

The Green Terror will look to exploit the Red Devils' passing defense with quarterback Brian Van Deusen throwing to a number of receivers.

In completing 126 of 247 attempts for 1,422 yards and 10 touchdowns, Van Deusen has five receivers who have at least 10 catches, one more with nine and another with eight.

The Dickinson offense will try to grind it out on the ground.

Tailback Chris Hughes has rushed for 394 yards on 90 carries with four touchdowns and his backup, Andrew Hinkle, was averaging more than 12 yards a carry through the first three games before missing the last two due to an injury. He should be ready to go against Western Maryland.

Redshirt freshman Dan Magee, a transfer from Holy Cross, took over as quarterback and had a good game last week against Franklin & Marshall, completing nine of 13 passes for 179 yards and two touchdowns.

On defense, Dickinson relies on linebacker Matt Bixler, who has earned CC Defensive Player of the Week honors twice this year. The Green Terror are led by linebacker Bob Symanski and defensive tackle Joe Krcma.

Dickinson has dominated over the past decade, but Western Maryland still holds a 26-23-1 edge in the series that dates back to 1904. Last season, the Red Devils claimed a 33-7 win at Western Maryland.

Terror soccer struggling

After a fast start, the Western Maryland men's soccer team (6-5-1) has fallen on hard times.

In going 5-0-1 to open the season, the Green Terror outscored its opponents, 22-7. In dropping five of its last six, the Green Terror has been outscored 18-7. The latest was a 7-0 setback to Muhlenburg on Saturday.

The Green Terror will try to bounce back under the lights tonight at Johns Hopkins.

The Green Terror women (5-3-1) put themselves in a tough spot on Saturday with a 2-1 loss to Haverford.

It put the Green Terror at 2-1 in the Centennial Conference with Haverford unbeaten at 4-0 in conference play. It puts the Green ** Terror in a must-win situation today when it travels to Gettysburg, which is 3-1 in CC play.

Western Md. on the run

The Western Maryland cross country team will compete in the Maryland State Collegiate Cross Country Championships Saturday at Hagerstown Junior College.

Greg Davis (Westminster) enjoyed a good afternoon Saturday at the Dickinson Invitational, finishing third out of 251 runners.

He covered the 8-kilometer course in 26 minutes, 6 seconds. The women got a fine effort from Kelly Parrish, who ran the 5K course in 19:07 to take fifth out of 208 runners.

Cavs replace offense

A big question South Carroll girls soccer coach Jim Horn had going into the season was who would provide the scoring with All-American Amber Clutter off to Campbell University.

He's had a number of answers. Ten players have scored goals in the Cavaliers' 7-0 start.

In the team's second win against county rival Liberty last week, ++ seven players scored in a 7-3 win that all but wrapped up the county title.

"This year, the feeling is anyone can score at any time and we've had shots going in from everywhere," Horn said.

Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.