As curtain falls on season, let movies raise your spirits In this lineup of videos, the hits just keep coming

Kids' corner

October 01, 1995|By JAMISON HENSLEY | JAMISON HENSLEY,CONTRIBUTING WRITER

It's the end of the regular season and baseball will be over in about a month. Here are a few movie suggestions -- all of which are rated PG or PG-13 and should be available at your local video store -- to satisfy your thirst for baseball during the off-season:

* "The Pride of the Yankees." This 53-year-old movie received a lot of attention recently. It's an excellent portrayal of Hall of Famer Lou Gehrig, whose consecutive-games record of 2,130 was broken by Cal Ripken last month.

* "Eight Men Out." A factual story about the 1919 "Black Sox" scandal in which members of the Chicago White Sox were indicted on charges of throwing the World Series for $80,000. The baseball action scenes are top-notch.

* "Field of Dreams." An uplifting fantasy involving an Iowa farmer who builds a baseball field in his cornfield at the urging of a mysterious voice.

* "A League of Their Own." The story of the all-women's baseball league of the World War II era. Combines drama with laughter and shows that men aren't the only ones who can play the game.

* "Mr. Baseball." A fading major-leaguer goes to play in Japan, where his arrogance gets him into trouble.

* "The Natural." An aging rookie fights his past to lead his team to the World Series.

Some recent movies that feature young ballplayers as the main characters include:

* "Little Big League." Inheriting a dispirited Minnesota Twins team from his grandfather, young Billy Haywood appoints himself manager and tries to outthink such major-league counterparts as Hal McRae, Phil Garner, Mike Hargrove and Gene Lamont.

* "The Sandlot." Set in 1962, this is a tale about a kid new to baseball trying to fit in with the neighborhood team. The movie centers on the kids trying to rescue a baseball autographed by Babe Ruth from a huge dog who lurks behind left field.

* "Rookie of the Year." A Little Leaguer able to throw 100 mph after his broken arm heals becomes the Chicago Cubs' ace.

Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.