Repentance to be subject of free lecture

RELIGION NOTES

September 29, 1995|By Frank P. L. Somerville

As the result of a schedule change by Baltimore Hebrew University, an item in Religion Notes yesterday stated incorrectly that a lecture on Jewish mysticism tomorrow would begin at 7:30 In fact, it will begin at 7 p.m.

The Sun regrets the error.

An expert in Jewish mysticism will explain his perspective on the High Holy Days theme of repentance in a public program Sunday night at Baltimore Hebrew University.

The free 7:30 p.m. lecture by Shimon Shokek comes just two days before the start of Yom Kippur, the most solemn observance on the Jewish religious calendar.

FOR THE RECORD - CORRECTION

Dr. Shokek's subject is "Repentance and Forgiveness in Jewish Ethics, Kabbalah and Hasidism." He is assistant professor of mysticism and philosophy at the university, 5800 Park Heights Ave. in Northwest Baltimore.

Dr. Shokek is the author of a recent book on Jewish mysticism, written in Hebrew.

Information: 578-6900.

Also on Sunday, Beth Israel Congregation will conduct an annual outdoor High Holy Days service at the Beth Israel Mikro Kodesh Cemetery, 5700 Bowleys Lane in Northeast Baltimore.

If it rains, the 11 a.m. service will be moved inside the Assembly Building on the property.

The Beth Israel synagogue, formerly in Randallstown, now is at ++ 3706 Crondall Lane in Owings Mills. Information: 654-0800.

At 8 p.m. Thursday, the night after the Yom Kippur fast, the Baltimore Board of Rabbis will begin a 15-week course, "Introduction to Judaism," at Baltimore Hebrew Congregation, 7401 Park Heights Ave.

It will be taught by local rabbis, and those who take the course will be expected to work with a Rabbinic sponsor, who will oversee individual study.

"The course is a useful vehicle for Jews who seek to gain a fundamental understanding of their heritage," Rabbi Daniel A. Weiner said.

It is also designed to help non-Jews gain a similar understanding, Rabbi Weiner added, "particularly those who may be considering conversion to Judaism."

For the cost of books, tuition and other information: 764-1587.

At Holy Trinity:

Baltimore's Episcopal Church of the Holy Trinity at 2300 W. Lafayette Ave. will honor 20 communicants celebrating their 40th anniversaries of confirmation or membership at the 10:30 a.m. service Sunday.

Also to be honored are 14 members celebrating their 25th anniversaries at Holy Trinity, said the Rev. Eddie Blue, the rector.

Deacon Althea Quarles will be the guest speaker.

Information: 945-0002.

For AIDS patients:

Singer-songwriter Debby Daff-Siggins will perform at 7:30 p.m. tomorrow in a concert to raise funds for Moveable Feast and for the Dundalk Church of the Brethren at the church, 2660 Yorkway.

Tickets are $7.

Moveable Feast delivers three meals a day, seven days a week, to homebound people with AIDS in the city and in Howard, Anne Arundel and Baltimore counties.

Information: 426-8134.

Revival:

The public is invited to a revival service, "A Light in the Dark," sponsored by Christians for Evangelism at 7:30 p.m. today at the Little Tabernacle Church of the Saviour, 1503 E. Baltimore St.

Information: 276-2317.

Food for the hungry:

Admission is free to the Lutheran Mission Society Festival from noon to 5 p.m. Sunday at Augsburg Lutheran Home, 6811 Campfield Road in Lochearn, but the public is asked to bring a can of food for the needy.

Information: 539-7322.

Worship and healing:

"Healing Life's Hurts" is the subject of an all-day ecumenical conference Thursday at the Charlestown Retirement Community's Cross Creek Conference Center, 711 Maiden Choice Lane in Catonsville. The public is invited.

Presentations by authors of books on reconciliation and forgiveness will include "When Did You Most Belong?" and "Don't Forgive Too Soon."

Sacred music and a worship service will be part of the free 9:30 a.m.-to-4:30 p.m. program.

Participants may bring a bag lunch.

A sandwich buffet will be available for $6.

Information: 247-3400, Ext. 530.

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