Taneytown turnovers Carroll County: Stability needed in office as municipality gets fifth manager in four years

September 26, 1995

RESIDENTS OF Taneytown certainly hope they have at last found the right city manager, the fifth person to serve in that capacity in less than four years. Charles P. Boyles II, who formerly served as city administrator in rural Hardeeville, South Carolina, took the job this month, replacing interim manager Henry Reindollar Jr., the former four-term mayor.

Mr. Reindollar took over the assignment in March, after former Army officer John A. Kendall left to take a job in Frederick city government. He, in turn, accepted the office a year earlier, after the firing of Joseph Mangini for reported complications stemming from financing of a residential development in the community.

Mr. Mangini held the position for 18 months, following the retirement of Neal W. Powell, who provided the last foundation of continuity in management of the northwest Carroll County municipality of some 4,500 residents.

A former mayor, Mr. Powell capably served as city manager for 15 years, using his expansive knowledge of the community to help direct its urbanizing growth.

The Taneytown city manager oversees a staff of 16 people and a budget of $2 million, which means that a committed, full-time official is needed. (No discredit to Mr. Reindollar or to Linda Hess, the clerk-treasurer who filled in during the vacancies.) The new manager will oversee the expanded sewage treatment plant project and deal with comprehensive development plans for the city.

Mr. Boyles says he likes the Maryland area and feels his experience in the rural yet growing area of South Carolina (near the Hilton Head resorts) will serve him well in Carroll County. Hardeeville is half the size of Taneytown, but has 2,000 hotel rooms that place large demands on the local government, he notes.

With a background in state government and municipal management, Mr. Boyles should be equal to the task. He promises to keep an open door to the citizens and to pursue a goal of quality growth, especially in the downtown.

As important as credentials and experience, however, will be the commitment to provide stability to the management of city affairs for Taneytown.

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