L. Corson Still, WMAR-TV film editorL. Corson Still, who...

September 24, 1995

L. Corson Still, WMAR-TV film editor

L. Corson Still, who became a film editor at WMAR-TV in the year the city's first television station opened and stayed with the station for 30 years, died of heart failure Friday at his home in Westminster after a long illness. He was 83.

Mr. Still edited film for WMAR news broadcasts until his retirement in 1977, said his wife of 57 years, Mabel Clickner Still.

A Baltimore native and 1931 graduate of Polytechnic Institute, Mr. Still served in World War II as an air-reconnaissance photographer for the Army Air Corps in India. Earlier, he worked for Eastman Kodak Co. in Baltimore and The Baltimore Sun, where he was a solicitor on a rural route.

He moved from Catonsville to Westminster after retiring from WMAR.

He was a past president of the Carroll County chapter of the American Association of Retired Persons and did volunteer photography for the Carroll County library system.

A memorial service will be held at 4 p.m. today at Pritts Funeral Home and Chapel, 412 Washington Road, Westminster.

In addition to his wife, he is survived by a son, Leroy Corson Still of Fort Lauderdale, Fla.; a daughter, Linda Mae Downs of Woodbine; and three grandchildren.

Arcadio Guerra, 46, a cook at Capriccio's restaurant in Little Italy who was shot to death in Patterson Park on his way home Tuesday night, will be remembered during a visitation for friends between 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. today at Della Noce & Sons Funeral Home, 322 S. High St.

Mr. Guerra emigrated six years ago from Guatemala, where he was born in Aguablanca, son of a vegetable farmer. He married and was a salesman in Guatemala City, friends said. His wife was killed in a robbery-shooting when he was 25, they said.

He is survived by a companion, Maria Rios; his parents, Jose and Margarita Guerra, two sisters, and various cousins, nieces and nephews, all in Guatemala.

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