Job fair draws 60 companies, agencies Glendening speaks of 'sense of urgency'

September 20, 1995|By Ross Hetrick | Ross Hetrick,SUN STAFF

Saying there is a "new sense of urgency" about creating jobs and matching people with those jobs, Gov. Parris N. Glendening yesterday kicked off a one-day job fair at Oriole Park at Camden Yards.

"We are facing a challenge in this state probably as crucial as we have seen in several decades," the governor told hundreds of people waiting to get into the fair.

That challenge includes a $2.5 billion cut in federal funds to the state and the probable loss of 20,000 to 50,000 federal jobs in the next five years.

"The only solution is to replace those jobs as well as to add new jobs from the private sector," Mr. Glendening said.

"When this decade is over, our goal is to have net increase, notwithstanding the loss of federal jobs, a net increase of 90,000 private sector jobs," he said. "I know we can do it, and this is a good start."

More than 60 companies and agencies, ranging from Roy Rogers to the FBI, took part in the fair that was held on the Club Level of the stadium, just outside the complex's sky boxes. Besides the state, other sponsors were the The Baltimore Sun Co., publisher of The Sun; and the Baltimore Urban League.

Organizers predicted 6,000 to 8,000 people would attend the fair.

"We're the largest provider of employment information in Maryland now," said Mary Junck, publisher and chief executive officer of The Sun. "I just think it's a natural extension of the Baltimore Sun to help people find jobs."

The state also used the fair to unveil a new computer listing system that job seekers can use at state offices or patch into from home computers. The new system will be available in nine state employment offices at the beginning of next month.

The Baltimore Sun had previously helped sponsor a state job fair at the stadium on March 21.

At that one, the Roy Rogers fast food chain was able to fill 50 hourly positions and 15 management jobs.

"This is an excellent process. This is the best," said Joe Karslo, regional human resources manager for Roy Rogers.

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