Reader's Guide to The Sun Wake up to a better newspaper

September 18, 1995

Today readers wake up to a better and brighter Sun. The aim of the new design we introduce today is to deliver a newspaper that is more informative, better organized and easier to read. The new look, while thoroughly modern, reflects the rich traditions of a newspaper now in its 159th year of publication.

This special section provides a guide to the changes in The Sun. In the pages that follow, we'll tell you where you can find your favorite features and columnists, and explain why we're using new headlines and typography.

Why the new look?

Over the last few years, The Sun has been steadily improving the quality of its reporting, writing, photography, graphics and all the other elements that add up to a first-rate newspaper. This design is intended to showcase those improvements - and to introduce new ones.

There are practical and aesthetic reasons for the new design as well. Because there is so much to read in The Sun, and we recognize that people are busy, we've taken steps to help readers quickly find what they want. We've added indexes to the front of every section, and we're using headlines that provide more information at a glance. We're also using a text type that is easier to read.

Aesthetically, we found the inspiration for our new design by looking back at our history, combining the best of the past with the latest technology in the tradition, much as the architects did at Camden Yards.

We've brought back classic type fonts and bolder headlines. They stand up better to the color photographs we use today, and like headlines of old, they convey a sense of excitement about the day's news.

We've also refined The Sun's flag, modernizing the historic engraving that promises "Light For All" and is recognized as one of the most distinguished nameplates in American journalism.

Content changes

You'll find improvements in virtually every section of the newspaper. Here are the highlights, explained in greater detail on the pages that follow:

* A reorganized main section that emphasizes the work of The Sun's state, national and foreign staffs and the kind of investigative journalism showcased in recent exposes on the abuse of Social Security programs and the CIA's involvement with the Honduran government's murderous Battalion 316.

* A Maryland section that includes an additional full page of news every day and features more thorough coverage of Baltimore and Baltimore County, more education news, and a new columnist. Readers in other suburban areas will, of course, continue to receive special packages of news about their communities.

* A new full-color weather map that is easier to use.

* A free-standing Business section Tuesday through Friday and, of course, Sunday. It includes an added page of content a day and provides authoritative coverage of the state and Mid-Atlantic region, along with a better package of news from the stock markets.

* A Today section that features stylishly written, substantive cover stories; news from the arts, lifestyle and popular culture; and a bigger-than-ever comics package spanning two full pages.

* A redesigned Live section that arrives on Thursdays so that you can start planning your weekend earlier. It provides more information on things to do, everything from the club scene to the fine arts and events for the family.

* A sports section that continues to provide thorough coverage of professional, college and high school sports - including the best coverage of the baseball and the Orioles anywhere - but makes it easier to read the box scores and to find results at a glance.

We've been preparing for this day for several years, building the staff in every department, setting our sights higher.

We've also been listening to you, our readers. We have surveyed thousands of Sun subscribers and shown the new paper to hundreds more. We've taken your suggestions seriously, and they have helped us to develop a better newspaper.

Today we're proud to present the new Sun. We're confident you'll enjoy it.

Questions? Comments?

Readers and advertisers who have questions or comments about the new look of The Sun can pass on their thoughts through our Sundial telephone information service. We'll be monitoring the calls closely.

To record your comments, call Sundial at 783-1800 and use the appropriate four-digit access code for the following areas:

Overall, what do you think of the new Sun?: 8851

Business section: 8859

Local news: 8858

Sports section: 8860

Today: 8855

Live section: 8857

Comics, puzzles, games: 8856

Design of the new Sun: 8861

Advertising: 8852

Customer service hours

Customer Service can be reached at 539-1280 or (800) 829-8000 between 6 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday, and from 8 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. on Saturday and Sunday.

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