Council denies payment for loss of lambs, sheep

September 17, 1995|By Glenn Small | Glenn Small,Sun Staff Writer

Janet Unfried, a Jarrettsville sheep farmer, made her final -- and unsuccessful -- appeal before the County Council last week to be reimbursed under the Harford County's livestock compensation law.

Mrs. Unfried, 56, had asked earlier this year for $300 to pay for the loss of three lambs and one sheep -- all presumed killed by dogs.

But the council refused to pay her and used her case as an example of why Harford no longer should have a livestock compensation law. The council said at the time that she had put in too many claims through the years and that she hadn't taken enough steps to prevent harm to her sheep.

Even though the council voted last month to repeal the livestock law, Mrs. Unfried was entitled to appeal the earlier decision against her.

She told the council Tuesday night that she got into the sheep-raising business 11 years ago when her husband died. Through the years, Mrs. Unfried said, sheep and lambs had been killed by wild dogs and family pets. She said she had made efforts to stop the attacks, such as getting a burro to scare the dogs away.

But her arguments didn't sway the council.

Neither did her comment: "I can add one more thing. The manure from the sheep grows outstanding tomatoes." It just drew chuckles.

The council denied her appeal, although Councilman Barry Glassman voted in her favor because he said the council should have given her a reason for the earlier denial.

In other action, the council:

* Voted to allow the Rehrmann administration to open a $10 million line of credit with First National Bank. The money would be used to pay start-up costs for county capital projects, allowing the projects to begin without forcing the county to go to the bond market right away. Last year, the county had a similar line of credit of $3 million. It had used $641,119, said James

Jewell, county treasurer.

* Approved a request by the Fallston Volunteer Fire Company to allow it to refinance a $1.3 million loan for the company's fire station.

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