New Market will be celebrating the good old days

DAYTRIPPING

September 17, 1995|By Dorothy Fleetwood | Dorothy Fleetwood,Contributing Writer

Costumed crafts people will set up shop on the brick sidewalks of New Market as the town celebrates New Market Days Sept. 22-24. Step into the 19th century with the sound of the blacksmith's anvil, the aroma of apple butter cooking over an open fire, Civil War soldiers and roving minstrels.

Horse-drawn carriages will take passengers past people who perform such old-time activities as soap making, paper making, chair caning, weaving and decoy carving. You will hear the Yellow Springs Band play from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday and a bluegrass concert on Sunday by the Orchard Boys. And there's more -- the country music of Slim Harrison and Tom Jolin, square dancing by the Gateway Singers, children's activities and country food served at several sites by church and civic groups and the New Market Grange.

Visitors can also browse through the more than 40 antiques shops that make the town famous. Hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day. Admission is free. For information, call (301) 865-3926.

Children's event

Bob McGrath of "Sesame Street" will headline the talent at the 1995 International Children's Festival Sept. 23-24 at Wolf Trap Farm Park for the Performing Arts in Vienna, Va.

The festival will feature performances by students from many lands as well as hands-on workshops. Joining the festival for the first time will be the Guselki Folk Dance Group from Russia. Youngsters from Finland and Hawaii will also perform music and dance. A festival favorite, the Chinese Youth Folk Sport Presentation from Taiwan, will present diabolo spinning, rope skipping and shuttlecock kicking techniques.

Children can also participate in a variety of art activities in the Artists' Workshop Tent, open from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 2 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. They can learn the arts of wall painting from Africa, Asian Sumi-e painting, stenciling of Colonial America, lei making from Hawaii, Navajo sand painting and origami from Japan.

The events will take place both days from 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., rain or shine. Tickets cost $10 for adults and teens; $8 for ages 3 to 12 and 65 and older; free for children under 3. Call (703) 642-0862.

Illuminating occasion

A Grand Illumination will light up the Maryland capital on Sept. 22 in honor of two great occasions: a commemoration of the 300th anniversary of Annapolis as Maryland's capital and the 150th anniversary of the Naval Academy.

Many buildings, historic sites, businesses and homes in the downtown area and at the Naval Academy will be illuminated. From 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Gov. and Mrs. Parris N. Glendening will welcome the public to Government House, home of Maryland's governors since 1870. An interpreter dressed as John Paul Jones will be stationed in the Naval Academy crypt, and an organ recital is scheduled in the chapel. At 7:30 p.m. there will be a pep rally at Annapolis City Dock, where the community can join the brigade of midshipmen as they launch the 1995 football season, which begins the next evening.

At 8 p.m. a procession led by the Chesapeake Caledonian Pipe Band and costumed historical characters will leave City Dock, head up Main Street around the State Circle and down Maryland Avenue to the Naval Academy. Light sticks will be given to all participants in the procession. All activities are free. Call (410) 268-3333.

Enjoying autumn

Fall festivals are beginning to appear on the calendar, and among the first is the Fall Harvest Festival at Steppingstone Museum near Havre de Grace Sept. 23-24.

Here's an event for all ages, offering hayrides, bobbing for apples, stuffing scarecrows, making apple butter, pressing cider, and pumpkin and leaf painting. The popular apple-pie contest is scheduled Saturday, and children will enjoy pony rides, a petting zoo and storytelling. For entertainment there will be live music, cloggers and square dancing, and numerous crafts people will be on the grounds to demonstrate and sell their wares.

Hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. both days. Admission is $4 for adults; free for children 12 and under. The museum is located on Quaker Bottom Road in Susquehanna State Park. Call (410) 939-2299.

On the shore

Here are three events that will attract people to the Eastern Shore next weekend. Sunfest '95 finds many people back at the beach in Ocean City Sept. 21-24. Most events will take place at the inlet beach parking lot. Big-top tents will be set up to house the more than 160 arts and crafts vendors, the purveyors of food and the entertainment planned all four days. Neil Sedaka will perform in concert on Friday, and Jim Messina (formerly with Kenny Loggins) is scheduled Saturday. Other events include the Sunfest Kite Festival, sky diving, treasure hunts and the Sunfest Boat Show at Shantytown Village. Hours are 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Thursday to Saturday; 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday. Most events are free. Call (410) 289-2800 or (800) OC-OCEAN.

In nearby Snow Hill you can attend the 10th annual Heritage Festival Sept. 23-24. Highlights include train excursions between Selbyville, Berlin and Snow Hill on Saturday and a House Tour from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday. Other Saturday attractions will be children's games and contests, a craft and flea market, pontoon-boat rides to Goat Island, Tilly the Tug Boat, a wooden boat show and boat auction, an exhibition of World War II memorabilia and "Dancing Under the Stars" that evening. Both days there will be food and free entertainment at the Riverfront, a model-train exhibit and an antique-doll exhibit. Call (410) 632-0809 or (800) 565-3900.

Historic High Street in Cambridge will be closed to traffic from noon to 5 p.m. Sept. 24 for the 19th annual Dorchester Showcase. Sponsored by the Dorchester Arts Center, the event will have a juried arts and crafts show, children's art activities, musical entertainment and Eastern Shore food. Admission is free. Call (410) 228-7782.

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