Hopkins moves up to 10th in survey of colleges 5 others in Md. rate high

September 08, 1995|By Mike Bowler | Mike Bowler,Sun Staff Writers Contributing writer Meghan Cronin contributed to this article.

Yale University's ranking in this year's U.S. News & World Report evaluation of the nation's "best" national universities was incorrectly reported in some of yesterday's editions; Yale was tied for second with Princeton. Also, the Johns Hopkins University Whiting School of Engineering tied for 17th in a ranking of 50 engineering schools.

The Sun regrets the errors.

The Johns Hopkins University, which fell from 15th to 22nd last year in a magazine ranking of national universities, recovered to 10th this year after questioning the methodology of the survey.

Harvard, Princeton and Yale were rated first, second and third, respectively, for the second straight year in the annual rankings of U.S. News & World Report.

FOR THE RECORD - CORRECTION

Dennis O'Shea, a Hopkins spokesman, said such year-to-year changes in the magazine's evaluations "are meaningless. The fact remains that Hopkins remains one of the nation's top universities. It hasn't changed that much in a year."

Nevertheless, Hopkins and other institutions questioned the way News counted faculty in reaching its conclusions last year, Mr. O'Shea said. He said Hopkins and other schools with large numbers of part-time faculty members teaching evening courses felt that they had been unfairly penalized.

When adjustments were made this year, he said, Hopkins rose from 97th to 15th in "faculty resources," one of the components of the annual evaluation.

The magazine's rating formula also includes academic reputation, Scholastic Assessment Test scores, financial resources, graduation rates and selectivity of admissions.

Five other Maryland institutions were highly rated in the magazine's annual survey, which is traditionally its best seller. The issue will be on newsstands Monday.

* The Maryland Institute, College of Art was rated fourth among schools specializing in the arts. The Juilliard School in New York led in that category.

* Loyola College in Baltimore and Hood College in Frederick were ranked seventh and 14th, respectively, among the best regional colleges and universities. Villanova University in Philadelphia was first in the north region, which includes Loyola and Hood.

* The University of Maryland College Park ranked 25th in both engineering and business. Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Stanford University tied for first in engineering; the University of California at Berkeley and the University of Pennsylvania tied for best among business schools.

* St. John's College in Annapolis was rated eighth nationally among liberal arts colleges in teaching quality, although the school was not included among the best 40 national liberal arts colleges, a list headed for the second straight year by Amherst College in Massachusetts.

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