Late August return likely for McDonald

ORIOLES NOTEBOOK

July 29, 1995|By Jason LaCanfora | Jason LaCanfora,Contributing Writer

The latest examination of Ben McDonald's pitching shoulder confirmed what he already knew -- that he has tendinitis and will be out until at least late August.

McDonald, who was placed on the 15-day disabled list Tuesday, was examined by Dr. Lewis Yocum in California yesterday, after an original consultation with Dr. Thomas Andrews in Washington. McDonald will not pick a ball up for 10 days, although Andrews recommended no throwing for two weeks.

Yocum "told me basically what everybody else told me," McDonald said. "We may be talking about coming back in September. A lot of that depends on where we are in the standings."

McDonald went on the DL June 22; he was activated July 14 but after only two starts was put back on the DL. McDonald said his shoulder is weak and yesterday he began his strengthening program. But, he might push himself back to the mound again before his arm is 100 percent.

"I imagine as usual I'll be back before I'm supposed to be," McDonald said. "I'll do what I can to come back as soon as I can.

"There's always that concern, but according to what I'm told by the doctors as of right now, I won't miss the whole season."

Happy homecoming for Devereaux

Mike Devereaux could have been bitter and upset upon his return to Baltimore last night.

The Chicago White Sox, the team he joined after the Orioles decided not to re-sign him after six years, have not lived up to their preseason billing at 35-47. But all is well for the man affectionately known as "Devo."

"There will always be a place in my heart for the Orioles," said Devereaux, who went 0-for-4 in his return last night. "I don't look at [not being in Baltimore] as a disappointment at all. I love the guys on [the Orioles]. But I'm happy in Chicago.

"There are a great bunch of guys there. I like the organization and I'm having a good time except in the loss column.. . . . I miss Baltimore, but Chicago wanted me to play for them."

If the White Sox are struggling, it's no fault of Devereaux's. He is batting 92 points higher than his 1994 mark at .295.

Up and down

The Orioles aren't done making moves. To make room for Bobby Bonilla, the team sent reliever Joe Borowski back to Triple-A Rochester.

Another move will have to be made today to make room for Rick Krivda, who will start in McDonald's place tonight. Mark Smith will likely be the choice to join Borowski in Rochester.

Borowski accepted his demotion calmly.

"I'm not disappointed at all," Borowski said. "I figured I'd be sent back down. At least they thought about using me once or twice. I know my time will come and I'll be up here to stay."

Hoiles close to return

The Orioles will have to make another move Monday, when catcher Chris Hoiles is scheduled to come off the 15-day disabled list with a strained left hamstring.

Hoiles has built up his running routine each day this week and he took live batting practice for the first time yesterday.

"He ran the bases well and it looks like physically he'll be ready to come off the DL by Monday," Regan said. "Whether he's ready batting-wise, we have to see."

Hurry up already

Major League baseball instituted some rules to speed up games yesterday.

The more notable alterations: With no one on base, a pitcher now has 12 seconds, instead of 20, to throw to a batter once he steps in the box; a manager must now signal a pitching change from the dugout steps; batters can only wander up to three feet from the box; and, half-innings are two minutes, five seconds long, down from 2 1/2 minutes.

"I think it'll maybe speed the game up a little bit," Regan said. "Personally, I don't watch my clock during the game. I don't think it's so much a time thing. It's more to keep the flow of the game and eliminate the dead spots."

Umpire Jim Evans met with the White Sox and Orioles before the game to explain the changes, which were not particularly well regarded by several Orioles.

"The people aren't complaining about the length of the games," first baseman Rafael Palmeiro said. "It's not the fans and the players who are complaining, it's the guys who don't pay to come to the games -- the media."

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