Baseball, but not Orioles, returns to Channel 2

TODAY'S TV

July 24, 1995|By Steve McKerrow | Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer

There are no Orioles in sight, but we've got prime-time baseball on ABC, the Battle of Stalingrad is fought again on PBS, and Herman Munster clomps back to cable.

* "Baseball Night in America" (8 p.m.-11 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- Billed as a prime-time series, a six-game schedule brings baseball back to Channel 2, former home of Orioles broadcasts. Tonight's matchup offers the Texas Rangers and New York Yankees. ABC.

* "Leave of Absence" (9 p.m.-11 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- How's this for a romantic dilemma? In this movie, first seen in 1994, Brian Dennehy stars as a man who learns his mistress (Jacqueline Bisset) has a terminal illness. He asks his wife (Blythe Danner) for permission to care for the other woman. Polly Bergen, who also has a role, wrote the story upon which the film is based. NBC.

* "Battlefield: The Battle of Stalingrad" (10 p.m.-midnight, MPT, Channels 22, 67) -- "Battlefield" documents Hitler's final, crushing defeat on the Eastern front, which cost more than 250,000 German soldiers in a Russian counterattack. PBS.

* "Late Show With David Letterman" (11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- With industry speculation that he is doomed to a costly, watery grave, lead guest Kevin Costner begins the publicity push for "Waterworld," his post-apocalyptic adventure film, due out this week. CBS.

Cable

* "The Munsters" (8 p.m.-11 p.m., Nick-At-Nite) -- Time for a trivia test: What other memorable TV series did the creators of this 1964-1966 CBS cult show previously produce? Cable's "classic TV" network offers a six-show run of episodes, with Herman (Fred Gwynn), Lily (Yvonne DeCarlo) and the rest. The comedy came from producers Joe Connelly and Bob Mosher, whose earlier hit was -- drum roll, please -- "Leave It to Beaver."

* "Archaeology: Who Built the Sphinx?" (8 p.m.-8:30 p.m., the Learning Channel) -- It's been a longtime riddle, but the documentary series reports that scientists now have some solid theories. Unfortunately, they must also work to protect the deteriorating world wonder.

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