Years ago, Tigers manager Sparky Anderson changed his mind...

WINNERS AND LOSERS

July 23, 1995|By Andy Knobel

Years ago, Tigers manager Sparky Anderson changed his mind about the designated hitter rule. "Instead of being ban, it stinks," he said. Now, there are reports tha AL owners may vote next off-season to stop using the DH. How some current DHs would fare in a league where pitchers hit (or tried to):

PLAYERS, COMMENT

Jose Canseco -- UP -- His elbow is shot, but how much arm do you need to play left a Fenway? Or to revive his knuckleball career?

Eddie Murray -- EVEN -- He's not the Gold Glove first baseman of yore but is healthy enough to snare a spot in the 500 Homer Club.

Harold Baines -- DOWN -- No active player has more hits as a DH -- or worse knees. He would be strickly a pinch hitter, though a great one.

Kirk Gibson -- UP -- If he's still healthy enough to crash into catchers, he's healthy enough to crash into outfield fences. Fences, beware.

Edgar Martinez -- UP -- He's used at DH to protect Seattle from losing his .364 average to injury. But his reflexes at third are more than adequate.

John Kruk -- DOWN -- "The only leather I likes was on my shoes," he says. "I should have put a glove on my foot, 'cause I kicked a lot of stuff."

Note: Statistics through Thursday

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