TERRY CLARKCareer recordSigned with the Orioles as a free...

UPCLOSE WITH ORIOLES

July 21, 1995|By Jamison Hensley

TERRY CLARK

Career record

Signed with the Orioles as a free agent on May 16. Began his professional career in 1979. Has played for seven organizations. Appeared in only 20 major-league games before this season. Had reconstructive surgery on his right elbow in 1993.

Personal record

Married to Lorraine Clark and has an 8-year-old son, Matthew. Turns 35 on Oct. 10. Attended Mt. San Antonio (Calif.) Junior College.

Favorite food

Mexican; Green chili chicken enchiladas

Favorite television show

Seinfeld

Favorite movies

"A River Runs through It" and "Field of Dreams"

Favorite music

Country; Garth Brooks and Alan Jackson

Biggest superstition

"I never step on the line going out. It's something I've always done, so I just don't do it."

Most influential coach

His junior college manager Art Mazmanian. "He taught me about pro ball because he managed the New York-Penn League Yankees for about 10 years. So he taught me a lot real quick. When I came into pro ball, I knew a lot more of the goings on."

If he wasn't playing baseball, he'd be ...

A fish and game warden

How he passes time on road trips

"Since they don't let us golf, we walk around, seeing a movie now and then. Basically, it's just hanging out with the guys."

Favorite road cities

Seattle, Toronto and Minnesota

First job

Working as a stockboy for A.C. Plumbing.

Favorite moment

"Pitching in my first game with the California Angels and beating Cleveland. Also, winning my first five starts -- everybody remembers that one."

Most embarrassing moment

"Everything was going so bad in one game against Minnesota that they got five hits in a row off me. The next batter was Kirby Puckett and he hit one off my leg. (The manager) came out and pretty much said, 'We got to get you out of here before your get killed' and I said, 'I'm with you, get me out of here.' "

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