Dead Eye gets liquor license back, but the bickering isn't over

THIS JUST IN...

July 19, 1995|By DAN RODRICKS

The Dead Eye is alive again. A Baltimore Circuit Court judge gave the popular dockside saloon its liquor license back -- pending an appeal of the Liquor Board's decision to revoke it. Capt. Dan Davis lost his barkeep badge last week -- to the chagrin of a few thousand rockers, boozers and boaters -- because he had been serving drinks on the Dead Eye's deck without approval. Davis and the city, unhappily bonded through lease agreements, have been bickering for years over rent, taxes and profits from the Baltimore Yacht Basin marina and the Dead Eye, both located under the Hanover Street bridge. Davis thinks city officials are out to "bankrupt" him to bring someone else in to run the place. He says he's going to sue.

More sartorial opinions

Since we published the results of a reader survey on Baltimore's best-dressed news dudes (Channel 2 anchorman Stan Stovall won), even more people have been offering opinions. "In my neighborhood," said a security guard who stopped me in a lobby, "we were saying Virg Jacques [Channel 11] and Rod Daniels [Channel 11] were the best, and [Marty] Bass, he's clean, too." By clean he didn't mean "without filth." He meant sharp, stylish. I agree with those mentioned, adding Jeff Barnd (45), Kai Jackson (13), Dennis Edwards (13), and Jamie Costello (2). They're clean.

FOR THE RECORD - PLEASE READ MEMO.

Sorry, wrong number

Submitted for your approval: An awesome coincidence, by Jonathan Jensen, bass-fiddler with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra: "A woman I was dating some years ago [Lynn Williams, former Sun staff writer] gave me her work phone number. The next day I dialed the number and asked for Lynn Williams. When she came on, I ignored the fact that her 'hello' sounded a bit strange and started to tell her how I'd enjoyed our evening out. To my astonishment the woman claimed not to know me at all! Seems I had misdialed the number but managed to come up with a Lynn Williams all the same. (I did manage to track down the right one and we eventually married.)"

Of Artscape and crabs

If you still haven't checked out "Sistine Chapel Ceiling II" by Joe Helms in the Mount Royal Tavern, do it during Artscape this weekend. . . . I guess Baltimore should be grateful for any ink it gets. That recent write-up in the travel section of the New York Times brought at least two women down here Saturday. They went to Glenmore Gardens for steamed crabs. How'd we know they were New Yorkers? They ordered "seltzer" with their crabs. (And, when asked, they confirmed they'd driven down for the weekend, having read about Baltimore's "quirky charm" in the Times. What can I say?)

More Eckman memories

Since Charley Eckman's death a few weeks ago, people have been recalling some of the declarations that bounced out of The Coach's mouth over the years, on and off the air. A Harford County man named N. Joseph Lee Jr. remembered something that happened while Charley umpired a game in the Susquehanna League in the early 1950s. "Once I was pitching and doing well," Lee says. "We had many runs and, if I remember correctly, the other team had none. Late in the game I threw one right down Broadway; it split the plate right across the belt. Charley called it a ball. I headed for the umpire. With a flourish, Charley removed his mask and chest protector and met me in front of the plate. I don't remember exactly what I said but it was probably, 'You blind bum, what was wrong with that one?' His reply: 'Nothin', I just wanted to see what you would say.' . . . And Craig Hankin remembers almost driving off a highway when, on the car radio, he heard Charley declare on WFBR that some baseball team owner was "so cheap he wouldn't pay a quarter to see Jesus come back on a bus!" . . . Rest in peace, Coach.

Seeking a Fitzgerald stamp

Bryan Sears, a big fan of F. Scott Fitzgerald, is lobbying the Postal Service to issue a stamp next year commemorating the 100th anniversary of the author's birth. Fitzgerald, who once resided in Baltimore, was born Sept. 24, 1896, in Minnesota. If you want to help Sears, his address is (no foolin') 4-C Fitzgerald Court, Baltimore 21234. . . . Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. is putting out a booklet called "What To Do Before The Lights Go Out," full of tips to prepare for thunderstorms. That's nice. But, where I come from -- the household of the former Rose Popolo -- prep for a thunderstorm was very simple: You pull all the plugs out of the walls, sit in the living room and say the rosary. . . . Bumper tag spotted on white Ford Bronco, Shawan Road: "NOT OJ." (Thanks to Jane Pearce, who reported it.)

Separated at birth?

Here are the photographs of Spiro Agnew and Phil Regan that should have appeared with Monday's separated-at-birth item. Hey, Phil, Ted -- just trying to have a little fun. . . . Coming up: Readers list the most poorly enforced speed zones on Maryland roads.

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