What's baseball got to do with it?

TODAY'S TV

July 11, 1995|By Steve McKerrow | Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer

Will the sour taste of the players strike change viewership levels for the "Major League All-Star Game," which has been the highest rated summer sports program for several years? If you're not watching the game, check out one of the funniest half-hours of the season in a "Frasier" repeat.

* "Major League All-Star Game" (8 p.m.-11:30 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- Baltimore has just two connections to the 66th-annual classic this year: Orioles' star Cal Ripken Jr., the American League's starting shortstop, and former Oriole Jim Palmer, doing color commentary with Al Michaels and Tim McCarver. The game is being played in Arlington, Texas. ABC.

* "Steel Magnolias" (8:30 p.m.-11 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Here comes the traditional gender-based tactic to counter major sports events. There's little question this 1989 film with Sally Field, Dolly Parton and Julia Roberts is aimed at female viewers. ABC.

* "Frasier" (9 p.m.-9:30 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- Here's a repeat of an episode that could become a comedy classic. Frasier (Kelsey Grammar) decides to fix Daphne (Jane Leeves) up with the new radio station manager (Eric Lutes). One problem: The man is gay, and assumes Frasier is speaking for himself. NBC.

* "Nova: In Search of Human Origins" (9 p.m.-10 p.m., MPT, Channels 22, 67) -- So what does make the human animal different? Things such as our upright walking style, use of fire and the development of language and culture, says a repeat edition of the science series, with anthropologist Donald C. Johanson. PBS.

* "Tina Turner: What's Love? Live" (11 p.m.-midnight, MPT, Channels 22, 67) -- The astonishing fiftysomething singer rocks through a concert special, with live stadium performance footage mingled with interview clips.

Cable

* "Fight Back: An MTV News Special Report" (5 p.m.-5:30 p.m. and 10 p.m.-10:30 p.m.) -- With correspondent Tabitha Soren as host, the program is aimed at young women and men who are victims of sexual abuse by family or friends. A toll-free telephone number offers viewers a chance to seek help while hearing the stories of abuse survivors.

* "Eagle Scout: The Story of Henry Nicols" (7:30 p.m.-8 p.m., HBO) -- This documentary recounts the story of the first person to publicly announce he had AIDS, an 18-year-old in Cooperstown, N.Y. He contracted the virus from a blood transfusion, and organized a community service project to spread awareness of the disease.

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