Sega's better electronics put life back into Series

KIDS' CORNER

July 09, 1995|By Jamison Hensley | Jamison Hensley,Contributing Writer

As Major League Baseball tries to find ploys to attract more fans, Sega Sports has discovered a way to regain the interest of baseball fans.

World Series Baseball 1995 is an updated version of Sega's best-selling sports game with a focus on increasing action.

"What I didn't like about the first World Series game was that it took so long to play one game," said Chad Feld, 11. "This one is a lot quicker, but still has the other's cool stuff."

That stuff includes selecting pitches from curveballs to fastballs and swinging for either contact or power.

The graphics have been touched up to add more realism. The batter is larger and more detailed.

The view from the batter's box angle is top-notch, scanning the likes of Fenway Park's green monster to the ivy-draped walls of Wrigley Field.

The graphics are not the sole adjustment. The sounds are crisp with the crack of the bat and amusing with the off-the-wall remarks by the game announcer.

World Series Baseball 1995, which is licensed by Major League Baseball and the Major League Baseball Players Association, has all 28 teams and allows everyone to be a general manager with the free agent/trade option.

Unlike the first game, the 1995 update has 50 former greats like Babe Ruth and Mickey Mantle and allows a player to form their own baseball Dream Team. There's also an option of staging a classic home run derby.

Sega also has branched out beyond the video games to gain the attention of baseball fanatics. Sega has a fantasy league on the Internet under the addresses http://www.segaoa.com and ftp.segaoa.com.

After selecting a roster, each game of the season will be played out at Sega headquarters through World Series Baseball 1995.

Like most fantasy leagues, the players get points based upon their performance. Each month, the top managers in the fantasy league win Sega products.

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