The great race is on, and it will be on area radio, too, for the Fourth of July

AIR CHECK

July 01, 1995|By Steve McKerrow | Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer

Remember the film "The Great Race" (1965), with Jack Lemmon and Tony Curtis as contending racers in the early automobile era? Ra- dio listeners can tune in a modern version of the event via WXCY-FM (103.7) in Havre de Grace on the Fourth of July.

Tydings Park, in this town on the Susquehanna River, is the only Maryland stopover of the third annual "Great American Road Race," in which 100 vintage and antique autos are racing from Ottawa, Canada, to Mexico City.

WXCY morning deejays Rico and Burt plan live coverage of the arrival of the cars from 5:30 a.m.-10 a.m. on Tuesday.

The vehicles and their two-person teams are expected to arrive at about 6:30 a.m. A parade through town is planned, and the cars will be on display for about three hours as part of the Havre de Grace Independence Day celebrations.

For information, call the station at (410) 939-1100.

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The anniversary of America's founding has spurred National Public Radio to launch a monthlong series, "Democracy in America."

Beginning Monday, daily installments of NPR news programs, "Morning Edition," "All Things Considered" and "Weekend Edition," will feature reports examining the state of democratic values and institutions in the nation.

Among other stories, correspondents plan a series of reports from Durham, N.C., chosen as a typical urban laboratory to examine the functioning of government, education and media.

The NPR programs are heard in Baltimore on WJHU-FM (88.1).

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Speaking of NPR, a new book that is based on a quarter-century of the network's reporting offers a fascinating capsule portrait of America.

"Listening to America: Twenty-Five Years in the Life of a Nation" (Houghton Mifflin, $24.95) was compiled by correspondent Linda Wertheimer, who has been with NPR since its first day on the air in 1971.

Like the first annual edition of "NPR Interviews," which was published late last year (Houghton Mifflin, $24.95), the book consists of from-the-air transcripts, including news reports, interviews and contributor essays.

A dip into any year's chapter offers a vivid time capsule. Curiously, the voices that speak most eloquently are not those of presidents and policy-makers, nor even those of the correspondents. Rather, they are those of ordinary citizens, interviewed in reaction to the news of the day.

For example, On Aug. 9, 1974, the day President Nixon resigned from office in the wake of Watergate, NPR affiliates opened their phones to listeners across the United States. The resulting range of opinions presents a stunning portrait of a polarized, puzzled nation.

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Gov. Parris N. Glendening is the scheduled guest on "The Marc Steiner Show" at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday on WJHU-FM (88.1), marking his third monthly appearance.

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