REMARKS from Robert Wright, president and chief executive...

Salmagundi

June 30, 1995

REMARKS from Robert Wright, president and chief executive officer of NBC, addressing the issue of violence violence in TV, as recorded by Federal News Service:

". . . Broadcast television programming, and certainly network television programming at NBC has decidedly less violent character than it had in past years by plan, by desire, by -- by focus.

"I can make that same statement, I believe, for the other networks because I'm pretty familiar with that programming.

"When you -- when somebody uses the word -- the phrase 'television programming,' that's when the alarm bells go off, because to different people that has enormously different meaning.

"I mean, the reality of it is somebody can go into a hotel, turn on a show, and see a lot of violence or a lot of -- a lot of material on that they're unhappy with, and they walk out and they say well, look what television is doing today.

"And the reality is that could be a pay service, it could have been an R-rated movie that was in a pay per view window, it could have been part of a particular pay movie service, and it generally -- it generally is when we track these things down.

"So I didn't say that television is meeting the nation's needs in terms of violence, but I did say that broadcast television, especially those that are involved with us, do.

"And on our cable side I would say exactly the same thing.

"There is a difference. The reality is there is always going to be a difference when somebody is making a decision to pay for something as to how much regulation one can have and where it comes from.

"So I don't think you can just use the word 'television violence' or 'television programming violence.' You have to be very specific as to where it comes from and under what conditions it's received in the home."

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