County Council hires new auditor

June 25, 1995|By Glenn Small | Glenn Small,Sun Staff Writer

The Harford County Council this week unanimously agreed to hire Raymond A. Dearchs as its new auditor, choosing the assistant Anne Arundel County auditor over two other finalists.

Mr. Dearches, 39, a certified public accountant, replaces Michael V. Treherne, who resigned in December.

The auditor works on an annual contract and is paid by the hour, up to $24,000 a year, for projects assigned by the council. He helps the council with fiscal issues and reviewing the budget.

"What is exciting about this candidate is he has government experience with other charter governments," said Council President Joanne S. Parrott.

Mr. Dearches lives in Towson with his wife and two children. He is a 1977 graduate of Loyola College and has worked for Anne Arundel County since 1981. He also has an accounting business.

In other council action:

* Councilman Robert S. Wagner, a Churchville cattle farmer, introduced a bill to revoke the county's livestock reimbursement law. Mr. Wagner said the law has turned the county into an insurance company for farmers.

The law requires the county to pay for cows, goats, sheep and other farm animals killed by dogs. Until last year, the state required counties to have such "predatory" laws. Now that such laws no longer are required, Mr. Wagner wants to do away with the local one.

* Councilman Mitch Shank announced that the 1960s rock band the Beach Boys will perform at 3 p.m. Aug. 27 in Havre de Grace. Proceeds from the $30-a-ticket concert will benefit the Susquehanna Hose Company, he said. For information, call 836-6218.

The council also:

* Gave approval for residents of the Trailer Rancho Mobile Home park, just north of Aberdeen, to connect to the Swan Creek sanitary sewer district. The approximately 120 mobile homes in the trailer park are hooked up to a private septic system, which has failed numerous times in the past 10 years, spilling raw sewage into nearby Swan Creek.

County health and public works officials advised the council to approve the move as an emergency measure because the sewage spills are a health threat.

* Heard testimony on revisions to the local building code. One of the changes includes requiring back door alarms on homes that have fenced-in pools with no gates in the yard. The idea is that if a child wanders out the back door of the home, parents would hear the alarm and could prevent an accident.

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