Baysox tickets benefit computer lab

June 12, 1995|By Consella A. Lee | Consella A. Lee,Sun Staff Writer

In just one year, Linthicum Elementary School's PTA raised about $12,000 to buy 30 computers to update the school's computer lab. But it needs an additional $33,000, according to Robert Anderson, chairman of the computer fund committee.

PTA members are selling tickets to the game tomorrow between the Bowie Baysox and the Reading Phillies at Prince George's stadium in hopes of raising more.

The PTA spent $1,000 to buy a block of 2,500 tickets for the 7:05 p.m. game and so far has sold only 400, at $5 each.

Mr. Anderson said he was surprised that ticket sales had been sluggish, but speculated that people may not be buying them because they are leery of computers in schools.

"I think there is some resistance because people see it as a substitute for teachers," he said. "But it's just a tool and an environment that our kids are growing up in. We really see a computer lab as just a tool to facilitate what the teachers and parents should be doing already."

In addition to profits from the baseball ticket sales, the PTA may get a boost from the Linthicum-Shipley Improvement Association. The association is to vote Wednesday on whether to donate $1,000 to the computer lab.

Throughout the year, PTA members have sold discount coupon books, staged a spaghetti supper and held a spring fair to raise money for the computer fund.

Yvonne Huang, owner of the Linthicum Luncheteria, has kept her restaurant open an extra three hours the past two weeks to serve dinner in an attempt to raise money for the PTA. But sales have been slow at the Camp Meade Road restaurant, which usually closes at 3 p.m. Mrs. Huang said most people probably weren't aware that the restaurant had temporarily extended its hours.

Mr. Anderson, whose son, Timothy, 9, will be a fifth-grader at the school in the fall, said the computers in the school lab are outmoded.

"We have 16 Apple computers, and I don't know if it's ever possible to get software for them," he said. "It's from the old days of Commodore and Apple."

The Andersons and some other families have computers at home for their children, but they said others don't.

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