Magic players want to make Game 6 a memory

June 04, 1995|By Orlando Sentinel

ORLANDO, Fla. -- When Game 6 mercifully drew to a close, and the Orlando Magic finished absorbing a 123-96 thumping by the Indiana Pacers, forward Dennis Scott and guard Anfernee Hardaway drew their teammates together at the free-throw line, and they gazed upward.

"We looked at the scoreboard," Scott said, "to remind everyone what we have to do."

All that's required is that the Magic rebound to defeat the Pacers in tonight's contest at Orlando Arena, and at stake is a trip to the NBA Finals. If Orlando fails in its first Game 7 in team history, the Magic will start planning for vacation instead of the Houston Rockets.

"I can't wait -- it's what all of us are talking about," Scott said of the deciding game of the Eastern Conference finals. "That's why we've played hard all year long, so we could get this one at home. We sure don't want to go on vacation yet."

The Magic also would like to avenge what they perceived as a slap at them on Friday -- the Pacers' dancing and yakking in Game 6.

"[Pacers guard] Byron Scott made a three in the corner late in the game, and he told Brian Shaw, 'What are you doing, boy, you know you can't guard me,' " Scott said. "The guy couldn't buy a shot all playoffs and now he wants to talk trash. But that's the kind of player he is.

"They can talk all the trash they want. The series is tied up. We've just got to go out and play. We have to take care of business."

Orlando, which had only been one playoff round in five years before this season, has never played in the final contest of a series, finishing off the Boston Celtics and the Chicago Bulls last month in less than the allotted time.

"There's absolutely no question about it, this is the biggest game in team history," said forward Jeff Turner, a charter member of the Magic.

"I expect this will be the loudest it's ever been in here. I hope so."

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