Stanley Elkin, 65, an award-winning author and an English...

DEATHS ELSEWHERE

June 02, 1995

Stanley Elkin, 65, an award-winning author and an English professor at Washington University since 1960, died Wednesday of an apparent heart attack in St. Louis. He won the National Book Critics Circle Award in 1982 for "George Mills." His 17th book, "Mrs. Ted Bliss," will be published in December.

Mary Robinson Godfrey, 109, who led the first team of women nurses aboard a troop carrier during World War I, died Sunday in Pittsburgh. She was the oldest female veteran in the Department of Veterans Affairs' records, said spokesman Jim McKinnon. She was chief nurse of a team of women assigned to the USS Leviathan during World War I after 2,000 soldiers came down with a deadly flu virus.

Alice Busch Gronewaldt, 91, a philanthropist and granddaughter of the founders of the Anheuser-Busch brewing empire, died of heart failure Saturday in Cooperstown, N.Y. She was the granddaughter of Adolphus and Lily Busch, who founded the company in 1852.

Daniel James Macmillan, 60, a descendant of the founders of the Macmillan publishing house, died of cancer Monday in Boston. He ran Community New Press, which published the Beacon Hill News, Back Bay News and the West End-Waterfront News -- all neighborhood newspapers in Boston. He was a first cousin once removed of the late British Prime Minister Harold Macmillan.

Salvatore Travolta, 82, the father of actor John Travolta, died Monday of a heart ailment in Santa Barbara, Calif.

Phil L. Burleson, 61, an attorney who teamed with noted lawyer Melvin Belli to defend Jack Ruby, died Monday of heart failure. He and Mr. Belli were unsuccessful in their case for Ruby, who was convicted of gunning down Lee Harvey Oswald on Nov. 24, 1963, two days after Oswald was arrested in the assassination of President John F. Kennedy.

Robert Alex Anderson, 100, composer of beloved island songs "Lovely Hula Hands," "Mele Kalikimaka" and "Haole Hula," died Tuesday at his Diamond Head home in Hawaii. Mr. Anderson, who would have turned 101 next week, composed more than 125 songs, specializing in English-language tunes known as "hapa-haole" songs that showcased the islands as a romantic paradise.

Paul J. Kramer, 91, a Duke University professor emeritus of botany, died May 24 in Durham, N.C., of heart failure after a long illness. He was considered a pioneer in the study of how plants absorb water. He wrote "Plant and Water Soil Relationships," published in 1949.

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