Bad ChoiceAs a daily reader of The Sun, I am outraged at...

SATURDAY MAIL BOX

April 22, 1995

Bad Choice

As a daily reader of The Sun, I am outraged at the fact that the only picture of the Rally for Women's Lives was of Denise Brown-Simpson hanging a tee-shirt for her sister, a victim of domestic violence (April 10).

What I'd like to know is where is the picture of the 85-year-old woman who endured the heat to be a member of the rally, or the picture of the many mothers and daughters who, like myself, went to experience the rally with one another?

What about the large number of students and National Organization for Women members who traveled hundreds of miles to attend the rally?

Why must we base everything around the O. J. Simpson trial? There are other newsworthy people in this world.

There were over 6,000 other white tee-shirts, each one representing women who were killed as a result of violence. Let us not forget them. They deserve our awareness.

Melissa Robin Wildman

Parkton

Necessary Changes

As a parent of a student at the Maryland School for the Blind, I couldn't help but be struck by the irony in The Sun's April 17 "expose" on the school.

On the same day the story ran, another article described how corporations and organizations increasingly are using interdisciplinary teams to plan and implement change.

MSB is a model for this innovative approach, with nearly a dozen such teams -- comprised of faculty, staff, administrators and parents -- tackling a host of issues.

is also ironic that some of the most outspoken critics of the school's recent restructuring are the very same parents who last year complained about a top-heavy administrative staff. Simply put, you can't have it both ways.

Change is difficult. Some good people who had devoted years to serving vision-impaired, multiply-disabled children lost their jobs. But, through these changes, MSB will be stronger and better prepared to meet the challenges it faces to continue its mission into the next century.

Jeff Valentine

Baltimore

Unjust Proposal

The proposed Armey-Shelby flat tax to replace the current income tax, as described in The Sun April 15, is unjust to civil service retirees.

The contributions to our retirement pensions were made with after-tax dollars, and currently we are able to recover these contributions on equal payments calculated over the span of our life expectancy.

Having contributed $58,550 during my career using my after-tax net income, and having a life expectancy of 260 months, I am permitted to recover this money (on which income tax has already been paid) at a rate of $225 per month until it is exhausted or I die, whichever comes first.

The flat tax pensions should not include that portion of pensions on which taxes have previously been paid.

The proposed Armey-Shelby flat tax is also unjust to those persons required to pay alimony. Currently, the payer of the alimony deducts the amount paid from income, and the recipient of the alimony adds the amount received to income for taxation purposes.

The proposed flat tax would shift the burden of taxes to the

payer of the alimony. This is equivalent to an employer being forced to pay the taxes of their employees and provide the employees with a tax-free salary.

Unless the flat tax permits the taxation of the recipient of the alimony income rather than the payer, then a corresponding federal law should be enacted which permits payers of alimony to deduct the 17 to 20 percent of taxes from all their alimony payments.

Not being an expert in financial matters, I am not sure I support a flat tax with a value added tax on consumer products, especially food. The current Maryland sales tax exemption on food seems reasonable in its concept.

Frank O. Long

Glen Burnie

Assessing Warhol

It is with great pleasure I read the article by John Dorsey, "Warhol portraits are incomplete pictures" (April 6), since I agree with him in all but one statement.

The first sentence of his article states that "Andy Warhol may be one of the great immortals of modern art. . ." That is far too generous a statement by Mr. Dorsey.

I would reluctantly accept the statement if it were modified to "pop" art. I would embrace the statement if it was changed to "commercial" art. There, I think he is king.

Lest anyone think I am an admirer of Warhol, my suggestion to the Baltimore Museum of Art is that when they are in need of funds they should consider cutting his "Last Supper" in half and selling it to another museum. The remaining half they could either reframe or sell that also if they could find a buyer.

Sanford Hershfield

Baltimore

One Race Only

Marilyn McCraven spoils an otherwise excellent rendering, "The Mitchell Papers: New Revelations" (April 15), by writing, ". . . when the races were even more polarized . . ."

Use of the word "races" is a grievous error and example of sloppy journalism which serves only to abet the ethnic polarization she decries.

For some time I have begged editors, journalists, elected officials and demographers to think, speak and write that there is only one "race," the human race.

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