Webb's luck, career-highs get a boost

BOWLING

April 16, 1995|By DON VITEK

Uppy Webb Jr. of Catonsville has been bowling tenpins for a long time and still doesn't completely understand the sport.

Until April 5, his best game and set were 278 and 698, respectively. Not bad for a 190-average bowler, who bowls in only one league -- the Wednesday Special -- at Brunswick Normandy.

Throwing a 16-pound Dick Weber Legend bowling ball (recommended, fitted and drilled by Howard Marshall), Webb pounded out his career-high individual game and set.

His first game of the night was a 255; then came a disappointing 189. But Webb wasn't through. His last game he came out throwing strikes, eight, nine, 10, 11 and a perfect game was on the horizon.

"That last bowl was solid in the pocket," the left-hander said. "And the seven-pin stood there as solid as the Washington Monument."

But the resulting 299 and 743 series established Webb's career-high game and set.

"I was throwing the ball just as good in the middle game as the other two," Webb said, "I still don't understand this game."

YABA at Columbia

One of the things that makes bowling a great sport is the simple fact that with the handicap system, beginners, even young beginners, can excel.

After week 29, the Prep Division (9-11 years old) Young American Bowling Alliance Team #3 at Brunswick Columbia had put together a nearly impossible perfect season.

That's right, a record of 44-0.

The team -- Noam Kowitt, D.J Damron, Amber Parlett, Erika Pierson and Tabitha Lanning -- was the last assembled from bowlers who were not assigned to teams.

Parlett has a shot at the Triple Crown; she's averaging 100, up from the starting 81, has a game of 160 and a series of 365.

Every single player on Team #3 is a first-time league bowler.

Junior Bowlers Tour

Now in its 20th season the Junior Bowlers Tour offers tournament competition to junior bowlers of all ages and averages.

The JBT will be at Brunswick Columbia on Sunday, May 7 with events in handicap and scratch formats.

It's a chance for the youth bowlers to win scholarships.

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